The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Flintshire, Denbighshire and Wrexham (Region)

Ancient gold artefacts uncovered in north Wales


The Late Bronze Age hoard of two 'lock' gold rings were discovered in the Community of Rosset. The wearer would've been a person of wealth and status within Late Bronze Age Society, between 10000 and 800BC.

In terms of their use, archaeologists aren't certain whether they were used as ear-rings or worn to gather locks of hair, as the name suggests.

In Wales, lock-rings have previously been found at Gaerwen, Anglesey, the Great Orme, Conwy and Newport, Pembrokeshire.

This largely coastal pattern hints at possible trading and communication links between Late Bronze Age communities living in Wales and Ireland....

http://www.itv.com/news/wales/2015-03-26/ancient-gold-artefacts-uncovered-in-north-wales/

Further information...

http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/news/?article_id=903
moss Posted by moss
30th March 2015ce

Cold Slad On Crickley Hill (Causewayed Enclosure)

Britain's 'oldest battle site' saved from destruction by rabbits


The National Trust says it has saved the site of one of the first battles known about on British soil which was under threat because of rabbits.

The site of the battle of Crickley Hill, near Gloucester, which took place more than 5,000 years ago between rival tribes, was in danger of being destroyed through erosion caused, largely, by rabbits.

The National Trust put up fences to stop erosion and back filled rabbit warrens to preserve the iron age hillfort.

Archaeologists said a major battle took place there in around 3,600BC, and the site was placed on the Heritage At Risk register until this year.

http://www.westerndailypress.co.uk/Britain-s-oldest-battle-site-saved-destruction/story-23668110-detail/story.html
Chance Posted by Chance
19th March 2015ce

Avalon Marshes (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Launch that canoe!


http://www.avalonmarshes.org/news?slug=launch-that-canoe-

In the past the reed swamp, bogs and mires of the Avalon Marshes were difficult to cross! Neolithic man overcame this by constructing trackways. However, in the Iron Age the marshes became far wetter and dugout canoes replaced these trackways.

Working under the guidance of Richard Brunning of the South West Heritage Trusts’ Hands on Heritage volunteers have recently completed two sections of replica trackway.

Today saw the literal launch of their next project having completed the construction of a dugout canoe. The canoe was launched at Natural England’s Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve and the volunteers paddled it through the open water between tall reeds as people would have done all those years ago.

The canoe was carved out of a single Beech tree donated by the Forestry Commission. The tree came from the Blackdown Hills near Castle Neroche. Whilst it was not moved across Somerset by manual labour it was hard manual work that carved the canoe from the tree! Replica Iron Age tools and the sheer hard graft of the volunteers were the key to success.

The volunteers are based at the Avalon Marshes Centre and meet up each Wednesday, come rain or shine, grafting away to replicate the techniques used in past times. The Hands on Heritage project is run by the South West Heritage Trust and is part of the Heritage Lottery funded Avalon Marshes Landscape Partnership.

THE DUGOUT CANOES

During the three years of the Avalon Marshes Partnership, we aim to construct a different dugout canoe each year, based on archaeological examples from different periods in prehistory.

The first one is an oak example based on later prehistoric vessels. This will be similar to the Shapwick canoe now on display at the Museum of Somerset.
http://www.somerset.gov.uk/museumofsomerset

It is currently under-construction by our Hands on Heritage volunteers, who are using tools familiar and fitting to those used in the Iron Age.

Keep an eye on our blog to stay up to date with our progress:

IN SEARCH OF TIMBER…
https://avalonarchaeology.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/in-search-of-timber/
PADDLING THROUGH PREHISTORY PT. 1…
https://avalonarchaeology.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/paddling-through-prehistory-pt-1/
PADDLING THROUGH PREHISTORY P. 2…
https://avalonarchaeology.wordpress.com/2014/03/04/paddling-through-prehistory-pt-2/
Chance Posted by Chance
19th March 2015ce

Bratton Castle & Westbury White Horse (Hillfort)

Fears over Westbury waste centre’s chimney


ttp://www.wiltshiretimes.co.uk/news/latestheadlines/11557066.Fears_over_Westbury_waste_centre___s_chimney/?ref=rss

First published Friday 24 October 2014 in Latest News by Katie Smith

Questions have been raised over a multi-million pound renewable energy centre which could be built in Westbury.

Councillors attending the highways, planning and development committee meeting on Monday raised factors that will be considered in a consultation requested by Hills Group Ltd, which is behind the project.

The meeting was chaired by Russell Hawker, Wiltshire councillor for Westbury West, who said councillors were still absorbing details of the plans released last week.

Northacre Renewable Energy Limited, part of the Hills Group, wants to build the centre on a 6.6-acre plot between Hills Waste Solutions’ Northacre Resource Recovery Centre and Arla Foods Westbury Dairies.

It will be sited in three buildings up to 20 metres high, but Hills is yet to release figures on the height of the chimney.

Cllr Hawker said: “The height of the chimney needs to cater for the possibility that we could get plume grounding towards the top of the hill running up by Newtown and Studland Park.

“It is something that definitely needs to be examined.

“We would expect the height to be at least higher than the top of the houses [on the hill by Newtown and Studland Park] which means higher than Lafarge.

“This is potentially an enormous chimney.”

The centre will use a process called gasification, which heats converted waste, processed at the existing Northacre Resource Recovery Centre, up to 1,400 degrees centigrade and converts it to gas to drive a turbine.

The second point raised at the meeting was what the exact chemical composition of the emissions would be.

“Technology is much better now,” said Cllr Hawker. “It’s bound to be more filtered than before but we still want to know what is coming out.”

The final key point raised was lorry movement and which routes the lorries would be taking to the proposed centre.

Cllr Hawker added: “I am in no doubt there will be a number of objections to this in due course.”
Chance Posted by Chance
18th March 2015ce

Cherhill Down and Oldbury (Hillfort)

Cherhill Down protest grows


Cherhill is a village in North Wiltshire and lies nestled beneath the Cherhill Down, well known for its White Horse and views of the Lansdowne Monument. This landscape is of national significance as recognised by its designation as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

Plans are afoot to build a village hall with large car park on the field at the end of Park Lane, Cherhill on the corner of the A4. This is a green field and lies directly opposite the Cherhill Down and White Horse (the photo shown is taken from this field). The field is outside of the village boundary and Park Lane is a Conservation area.

Please sign this petition to stop any development on this field, whether the use is for community or housing. To build here would change the landscape of this area, affecting the Conservation area within Cherhill, the scenery from the A4 and visual approach into the village, as well as being highly visible from the Cherhill Down. The additional noise, traffic, artificial lighting and disruption will detract from the natural beauty of this area and present road traffic safety issues.

https://www.change.org/p/wiltshire-council-stop-any-development-on-park-lane-field-in-cherhill

https://www.facebook.com/savecherhillfield
Chance Posted by Chance
17th March 2015ce

Avebury & the Marlborough Downs (Region)

New Stone Avenue Discovered at Avebury


A remarkable new Stone Avenue has been located at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Avebury in Wiltshire.

http://www.the-stonehenge-enigma.info/2015/03/breaking-news-new-stone-avenue.html
Chance Posted by Chance
11th March 2015ce

Devon

Devon archaeological dig reveals "exciting" prehistoric finds


Follow up to news story from October.

"A Stone age knife, a Bronze age arrow head and a Roman nail are just some of the surprises uncovered by a new archaeological dig in Devon.

The idyllic fields around Spriddlestone, near Plymstock, were first identified as a potential area of historical interest by amateur archaeologist Howard Jones.

But what began as an armchair project to find a prehistoric settlement – with Google Maps as his only tool – has now progressed into a two-week on-site exploratory dig."

Read more: http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Devon-archaeological-dig-reveals-exciting/story-26142640-detail/story.html#ixzz3U0yoxIcB
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th March 2015ce

Northern Ireland

Huge ringed fort is thought to date back 4,500 years to Neolithic times


Archeologists are probing a Neolithic henge in the middle of Aghagallon which they believe dates back more than 4,500 years. It the reason why Aghagallon has its name and now the Standing Stone is to be given its proper place in history.

Aghagallon, translated from Gaelic means Field of the Standing Stone, and it was just a few years ago that its true significance was uncovered when they discovered the giant ringed site.

For many years it was unclear where this standing stone might be, however when the local community association made plans to extend its building on the Aghalee Road, it was discovered that they were right beside the standing stone.

The ringed site which is in the townland of Derrynaseer was designated as a scheduled historic monument in 2003.

It is formed by a large earthen bank which encloses a domed area some 180m in diameter and is clearly visible on Google Earth.
read on.....

http://www.lurganmail.co.uk/news/local-news/huge-ringed-fort-is-thought-to-date-back-4-500-years-to-neolithic-times-and-is-one-of-only-eight-left-in-northern-ireland-1-6601818
moss Posted by moss
9th March 2015ce

Boheh (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art)

Megalithic rock-scribing found near Croagh Patrick


A rare sample of megalithic engraving or “rock-scribing” has been found on an ancient pilgrimage route to Croagh Patrick in Co Mayo.

The prehistoric ornamentation resembles that found in Lough Crew, Co Meath, and is one of just of two rock art samples of its type to be identified west of the Shannon, according to archaeologist Michael Gibbons.

The panel had been concealed behind the outcropping at the Boheh townland known as St Patrick’s chair, which has some 250 petroglyphs or carvings on its surface. The carvings are believed to have been inspired by the “rolling sun” phenomenon, where the setting sun appears to glide down the flank of Croagh Patrick during the months of April and August.

More: http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/megalithic-rock-scribing-found-near-croagh-patrick-1.2119328
ryaner Posted by ryaner
28th February 2015ce

Great Orme and its Environs

"Blodwen" comes home!


The 5,000 yr old skeleton found on the Little Orme by quarrymen 123 yrs ago finally comes home to Llandudno and will be the centre of a major exhibition in April.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/blodwen-skeleton-returns-north-wales-8655319
Posted by JohnAko
17th February 2015ce
Edited 18th February 2015ce
Showing 1-10 of 2,191 news posts. Most recent first | Next 10