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Ballingarry (Rath) — Folklore

Gubbin's Moat.

This is situated in the townland of Ballingarry, Barony Coshlea. A "light" was always associated with it. It is near a graveyard and the light was supposed to be seen going from there to the moat and back again. In my young days when passing by that moat (there is a double ditch beside it, a short cut to village of Ballylanders) we would walk very quietly and silently and never go nearer than the double ditch and we would not dream of crossing at night. Now all that fear is gone.

A story was told by my father (RIP) how one night about midnight he was returning from a hayrick and a light left this moat and went along the road before him and when he came to the crossroads near Ballingarry he heard trampling as if horses were travelling fast but saw nothing and the light was still there. The noise turned at the cross and went along the road whence he had come, towards the churchyard, and the light left him and also went back, and he could see the light facing for the moat again. He used to say that it was a funeral of someone who had been buried in a place he or she did not like and was coming back to their own burial ground.
I think this must be the right place from its proximity to the churchyard and the footpath. It's recounted in the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being transcribed at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
29th May 2016ce

Hob Hurst's House (Burial Chamber) — Fieldnotes

Very bitter sweet visit today. My last visit was with stubob. Good company kept my spirits up though, and searching for the weird "banana" cairn along Harland edge. That's a very strange site indeed. Glad i made the effort to push on as we debated turning back twice.

As for HHH it was looking fine today. No rubbish laying around, no offerings etc bar a couple of flowers. There is a geocache in one of the corners, not that i mind of course, suppose it gets people to the site that wouldn't normally visit. :)
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
29th May 2016ce

Doonglara (Glenbrohane) (Rath) — Folklore

Glenbrohane (Knocklary, Barony of Coshlea, and Co. Limerick) has a collection of moats. Hardly a farm that does not hold a moat and the old people and some of the younger generation hold these moats in great awe and veneration. No one would be allowed to cut a bush off one of them or interfere in any way with them, and stories are told of punishments meted out to some who did dare to interfere with them.
In this place are 13 or 14 moats and from the top of any one of them, three more are visible.

The largest moat of all is in a farm called Quane's, and is known as Quane's moat, and it is said to be the second largest in Munster, and it is said that it is from a chief who once lived there that the name Glenbrohane is got. The Glen of the Brohans (Brohan's being the name of the Chieftain). From this large moat, the others circle so that a complete half circle is formed by all. An underground channel connects all but so far, no one seems to have gone down and explored any of these passages.

One of these is said to have removed from one farm (Madden's) and goes across the river to another farm (Howard's) in one night. The hollow is in Madden's farm where they say the moat once stood. The late owner of the farm - Howard's - would not allow a bush to be cut from the moat, so that it is overgrown with furze bushes, and I remember myself as a child passing by that silently and very [sickened?] lest the fairies would hear us within. That idea prevailed in this place up to the last generation, who had a great dread of insulting the fairies or rousing their anger in any way, but at present bushes are being cut and these moats are regarded as part of the farms and no more. But when the antiquarians were excavating in Cush-Kilfinaine, Co Limerick, which is only one mile from here - a man who had a moat on his farm would not allow them interfere with it, lest there may be reprisals by the fairies.

Laune's Moat, in the townsland of Glenbrohane, is a very large moat and though it was overgrown a few years ago, a man came along and cut away all the furze from it, but he lost the farm, and the old people said that it was not right to interfere with the moat.

Story:- The owner of this - Morgan Laune (RIP) had made up his mind to cut the bushes from this one day, years and years ago. He had a very quiet old horse and he harnessed him meaning to take down a car to bring home the bushes. No sooner was he harnessed than away with him from under the car, towards the moat and fell dead at the entrance to the moat.
Ever after, no one ever interfered with that moat during his life time, but the bushes are being cut now and the grass mown off it.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, currently being transcribed here and here at Duchas.ie. I'm not sure which of the many moats are the ones referred to. The grid reference I've give is the largest and is named 'Doonglara' on an old map.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
29th May 2016ce

Tre'r Ceiri (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Tre'r Ceiri</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Knockmany (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

This was a complete surprise. Stopped off in Co. Tyrone to visit some old friends of the friend I was travelling to Donegal with. They just happened to know Mark Bailey the Director of Armagh Observatory who holds the key for Knockmany. He and his wife very kindly accompanied our small group up to the cairn which sits at the very top of a reasonably steep hill - commanding 360 degree views in all directions. Going inside the chambered cairn was a real thrill - my first close encounter with Irish rock art. Mark Bailey has the theory (a good one I should think) that the skies were once far more active in terms of comets and visibility that they appear to be now. And that the spiral shape with a 'tail' replicates a comet tail structure. We decided that the cairn was aligned north/south orientated due south towards Slieve Gullion and the Mornes. The cairn now has a clear glass covering and is not accessible without the key to the grill gate. However, most of the tomb can be seen quite well through the gate. tjj Posted by tjj
29th May 2016ce

Tre'r Ceiri (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Tre'r Ceiri</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Knockmany (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Knockmany</b>Posted by tjj<b>Knockmany</b>Posted by tjj tjj Posted by tjj
29th May 2016ce

Yr Eifl (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Yr Eifl</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Knockmany (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Knockmany</b>Posted by tjj<b>Knockmany</b>Posted by tjj<b>Knockmany</b>Posted by tjj tjj Posted by tjj
29th May 2016ce

Dun na h'Airde (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 23, 2016

As you walk towards Greshornish Point following the eastern shore of Loch Greshornish, you encounter, after approximately two kilometres, a steep rocky eminence, almost cut off by the sea. Oval in shape and girdled by steep cliffs, particularly on the north and east, its summit slopes significantly from north to south. A tumble of fallen masonry marks the western rim of the summit, although several sections of original walling, several courses deep and up to a metre in height can be identified, as can the entranceway.

You can read much more about Dun na h-Airde on Carnmore.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th May 2016ce

Y Gyrn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Last time on The stone hunters guide to Wales.....

Snow and ice coupled with miles of difficult walking meant the stone hunters missed the freaky settlement site of Maes y Caerau, and it meant they didn't have a really good look at the pair of cairns nestling under the rocks of Y Gyrn, so after three years of tripping elsewhere our intrepid explorers are back in the hills above Harlech for a more in depth look around.

21st May 2016.....

From the A496 a mile north of Talsarnau turn east up hill towards the little but lovely Llyn Tecwyn Isaf pass it by and take the next right, we parked just across the river and walked from there. The map is a bit confusing after here, you could try following the footpaths or just strike out on your own heading for the right side of big and obvious rocky Y Gyrn.
The leaves are back on the trees, the streams are all full of dark water, birds are singing and the weather is trying it's best not to rain on us, as per our request, likable, to say the least.
After much map reading, some serious leg work, spotting the freaky settlement site across a falling stream and a lot of staring at the views we arrive at the two cairns. Map still says there are three cairns, but we can still see only two, the third is either buried or it's some kind of mistake.
I head straight for the higher of the two, it's a nice little kerb cairn with an opened cist at it's centre. One of the two side slabs has fallen inwards obscuring a proper scootch about in there, I cant even tell if the two end slabs are in attendance,
the kerb stones now free of snow stand out much more. Y Gyrn looks like a really good play ground from here, no swings and slides, but rock and boulders, nooks and crannies, distant views and in your face nature.
Over a little stream about a hundred yards is the other cairn, we knew it was a ring cairn but in the snow three years ago that was not very evident but now the ring is naked and brazen and she is showing it all and we can see it all. She is definitely a ring cairn, and one with a view through a gap in the hills to the sea. Why are they always female ?
No prizes.
After butties under a rock shelter with a view of both cairns, and a walk over to Bryn Cader Faner we climb up to the top of Y Gyrn, where a long eye full reveals all three sites, looking down to the ring cairn is as always especially rewarding.
A revisit to these cairns and the freaky settlement site has been high on the list for over three years, now we've done it I can cross them off, it's not a physical list, but excising them from thought should make the whole thing run smoother, just like my lovely car.
postman Posted by postman
29th May 2016ce

Yr Eifl (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Yr Eifl</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Nant Gwrtheyrn (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Nant Gwrtheyrn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Nant Gwrtheyrn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Harlech Circle (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

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29th May 2016ce

Carreg (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Carreg</b>Posted by postman<b>Carreg</b>Posted by postman<b>Carreg</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
29th May 2016ce

Yr Eifl (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Yr Eifl</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Yr Eifl (Round Cairn) — Miscellaneous

Yr Eifl means "the Trident", from its three striking peaks. The Welsh name has been Anglicised into The Rivals.

One the three peaks is occupied by the frankly astonishing Tre'r Ceiri hillfort, but is also topped with a large Bronze Age burial cairn. The other two summits also have BA cairns.

The highest of the three peaks, Garn Ganol, rising to 564m OD straight from sea-level at Nant Gwrtheryn, boasts two cairns, one substantial and intact, the other rather wrecked and fragmentary. GAT:
Summit cairn at SH36484474

A large featureless summit cairn on top of Yr Eifl. Visible on skyline from parts of Pen Llyn to W and SW and from Tre'r Ceiri to SE. Made from randomly piled large stones collected from around summit. A substantial hole, forming a shelter, has been dug into the cairn, about 2.5m wide and up to 0.8m deep. This contains broken glass, burnt plastic etc. Trig pillar also stands on cairn, also 1 small (1.5m diameter, 0.3m deep) excavation in W side.

Southwestern cairn at SH36464472

33.3m SW of the summit cairn. The top levelled and used as a platform for a small modern cairn.

Low circular cairn markedly different from the other cairn on Yr Eifl (PRN 616). Made up of small stones 5cm long with occasional larger 0.5m long slabs. Very low and flat in profile intervisible with Tre'r Ceiri cairn & Carnguwch. Could this cairn have been robbed to form 616?
The northwestern peak (Garn For or Pen Bwlch yr Eifl) has been (and still is being) badly damaged by quarrying, but there is still a cairn on its summit. GAT:
A surprisingly large cairn considering that the summit area is quite small. There is an original cairn base about 10m diameter and up to 1.2m high and this has traces of laid slab kerbing in places - not just a heap. On this has been built a modern 'pillar' cairn about another 2m high and there has been other disturbance as well. The original cairn is so large and well-built it seems likely to be prehistoric and resembles those on Yr Eifl and Tre'r Ceiri.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Trwyn Porth Dinllaen (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Trwyn Porth Dinllaen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Garn Boduan (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Garn Boduan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th May 2016ce

Dun na h'Airde (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun na h'Airde</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th May 2016ce

Dun Vlargveg (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 23, 2016

Just two kilometres north of Dunan an Aisilidh at the tip of the Braes peninsula, and just north of the mouth of the Ollach River, stands Dun Vlargveg, which consists of a stone wall positioned along the top of a rock outcrop overlooking a cliff-girt promontory.

This wall is almost twenty metres in length, and its outer facing rises to three courses in places. Canmore states that Dun Vlarveg is connected to the mainland by a natural rock arch, but the topography is so steep that I dared not descend from the neighbourhood of the wall towards the level grassy area to confirm this. I would suggest that safety ropes would be required by those wishing to make the descent, which is down steep grass on which a slip could well prove fatal.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th May 2016ce

Dun Vlargveg (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Vlargveg</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th May 2016ce
Showing 1-50 of 117,476 posts. Most recent first | Next 50