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Fingerem Stone (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Just to add to that. This statement if weird - "It is on the left-hand side of the road as one travels from Ringinglow to Fox House and near to the last-named place. I was not permitted to approach the spot for fear of disturbing the young grouse, but as far as one could judge from the road it is a heap of stones scattered here and there. I cannot say more without a nearer examination."

Whilst the location here is correct, if you were travelling the old road (as he were) the Fingerem stone would be easily visible, almost within touching distance in fact, so the how he could not see it, if it still existed doesn't make sense. Take a look at the placed marked on the old map and how the feature is right by the road. It doesn't make any sense.
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
2nd September 2014ce

I searched extensively for this stone but found nothing bar the one in the pic i just uploaded. Pretty surprised to see this site listed here to be honest, given there's no evidence for it being of any age.

Another strange thing is it being listed as "Cairns/Destroyed", i highly doubt that was the case, seems 2+2 came out as 5 imo.

The area to the (very) immediate N/NW is very boulder strewn and could easily be mistaken for a cairn site from the view given in the old text. I guess some of this is natural added to with clearance. I very much doubt this refers to a cairn/cairns. More likely a way marker of some form that's now long gone.
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
2nd September 2014ce

Fingerem Stone (Cairn(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Fingerem Stone</b>Posted by harestonesdown harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
2nd September 2014ce

Giant's Rock (Rocking Stone) — Images

<b>Giant's Rock</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Giant's Rock</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Giant's Rock</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Zennor Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Zennor Quoit</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Zennor Quoit</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Zennor Quoit</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Foage (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Zennor Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Folklore

The logan stone up on Zennor Hill has a sad tale attached to it, associated with Carn Galva to the west:
The giant of Carn Galva was a gentle character who protected the people from the more warlike giants of Lelant. He was a playful, sociable giant, fond of a young fellow from Choon, who used to visit him. One day they were playing Quoits, when the giant “tapped” his playfellow on the head with the tips of his fingers. At the same time he said, “be sure to come again tomorrow, my son, and we will have a capital game of bob”.

But the giant’s fingers had gone right through the boy’s skull, and though he tried to save him, it was no use. The giant mourned for his dead friend, but in seven years or so he pined away and died of a broken heart. The logan stone on which he used to rock himself remains at Zennor.


Robert Hunt, Popular Romances of the West of England, 3rd edn, London, Chatto and
Windus, 1881
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Caisteal An Dunriachaidh (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater Posted by Blackwater
2nd September 2014ce

The Boxes (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

This is probably the barrow mentioned in the list of lows in Plot. ";and that other in a field near the left hand the way, as you pass between Mathfield and Ellaston near Colwich-Common, without a name; and another larger over against it, at the other end of the common, which they call Row-Low." Source: "The Natural History of Stafford-shire" Plot, R. 1686 p.404 paragraph 21.

So Calwich Low and Row Low both have names attached so the barrow near The Boxes is probably the one 'without a name'.
BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
2nd September 2014ce

Hanging Bank, Ecton Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Folklore

A Giant's Grave?

Robert Plot mentions that men's bones "of an extraordinary size" were found when a Low on Ecton Hill was opened. Apparently these bones were "preserved for some time by one Mr. Hamilton vicar of Alstonefield". Source: The Natural History of Stafford-shire", Plot, R. 1686. p.330 paragraph 109.

This is probably the low mentioned by Plot "on Ecton" in the list of lows on p.404 paragraph 21.

When Carrington opened Hanging Bank barrow on 18th May 1848 he noted that the site had been previously disturbed.

Bateman believed that this barrow must be the one Plot refers to as it is the only one of the five on Ecton that showed evidence of having previously been dug into.

There are plenty of examples from around the world of "Giant's bones" being discovered which are in fact the bones of large animals that have been misidentified - is that the case here? Maybe / maybe not - there are certainly examples of animals being interred in barrows in Staffordshire but these tend to be either smaller animals such as a dog, a pig or a polecat or they are part of an animal such as an Ox's head or antler tines. So could this just be the burial of a strapping, big warrior? Would that warrant the description "...bones...of an extraordinary size"?

It is a pity we do not know what Mr. Hamilton did with the bones he 'preserved'.
BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
2nd September 2014ce

News

Neanderthal 'artwork' found in Gibraltar cave


Mounting evidence suggests Neanderthals were not the brutes they were characterised as decades ago.

But art, a high expression of abstract thought, was long considered to be the exclusive preserve of our own species.

The scattered candidates for artistic expression by Neanderthals have not met with universal acceptance.

However, the geometric pattern identified in Gibraltar, on the southern tip of Europe, was uncovered beneath undisturbed sediments that have also yielded Neanderthal tools.

Details of the discovery by an international team of researchers has been published in the journal PNAS.

There is now ample evidence that Neanderthal intellectual abilities may have been underestimated. Recent finds suggest they intentionally buried their dead, adorned themselves with feathers, painted their bodies with black and red pigments, and consumed a more varied diet than had previously been supposed.

One of the study's authors, Prof Clive Finlayson, director of the Gibraltar Museum, said the latest find "brings the Neanderthals closer to us, yet again".

Continued on the link below...


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28967746
moss Posted by moss
2nd September 2014ce

Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid</b>Posted by Blackwater Posted by Blackwater
2nd September 2014ce

Lurgan (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Lurgan</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Lurgan</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
1st September 2014ce

Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Cnoc An Liath-Bhaid</b>Posted by Blackwater Posted by Blackwater
1st September 2014ce

Towednack Double Armed Cross — Fieldnotes

25 June 2014

Surprised to find this on TMA. The cross is carved into a long granite slab and looks medieval to me - perhaps a grave slab. There's much of interest to look at inside the church, but all rather outside TMA's scope.

One nice bit of folklore though, to explain the shortness of the tower - each time the masons got it higher than the present level, the Devil would knock it down again. Eventually they gave up, making it unique in being the only medieval church in West Penwith without pinnacles on the tower.

From here we headed up over Amalveor Downs to visit an old friend, Zennor Quoit.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
31st August 2014ce

Towednack Double Armed Cross — Images

<b>Towednack Double Armed Cross</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
31st August 2014ce

Ty Ar Boudiged (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Today we have been to Brest, to Oceanopolis, Brittany's biggest aquarium, our hotel in Vannes is about a hundred miles away. In between the two, more or less, is Ty Ar Boodigay. Ever since Moth and Jane went there nearly five years ago, the name has been rattling round my head, and, even if the precise picture of it had faded in my mind the memory of a perfect chambered cairn had remained, I must see it, I decided, next time I'm in the area (like I come here all the time?).

It is a drive of over forty miles from Brest to Brennelis and I'd be needing some petrol, so I chose to go along the main N12 duel carriageway from Brest to Morlaix, but there was not one petrol station (at home I'd have passed at least three), very close to running out I went into Morlaix, a big town, but not big enough to have a petrol station though. I thought of going to Barnenez cairn instead, but stuck to my guns, in the end I found a petrol station after much panicking and flustering, and soon we were heading south on the right road, with petrol a plenty. Bloody Frenchies.
Brennelis is a very small town in Brittany's rocky hilly interior, it is as hilly as it gets in Brittany but it's nothing like Snowdonia or owt, a bit like Bodmin moors high places.

The official car park quickly passed us by on our left, so we turned back and parked up, it was a big area but we were all alone. Nice.
The chamber is visible under a tree and close to the car, half a minutes walk. The back end of the chamber is arrived at first, something has been removed from the side of the chamber and you can scramble in through the wide gap.
But I like to walk all the way round before I go in, but all the way round can't be done because of a low wall that slightly truncates the barrow, that and a bit of graffiti inside are all that's wrong with it.
Around the front is the entrance, and it is a wide and welcoming entrance that beckons you in, I suspect that a cap stone or two may be missing from the very front. Inside it is dry, light and airy, and there is a standing stone. What ?
Where have I seen one of those before ? well Bryn Celli Ddu for a start, and like that one the stone is not structural in any way, very mysterious.
It's late in the afternoon now and it's almost time to go, it has been a perfect time here at Ty Ar Boudiket, a picnic would be ideal, a cold beer or two sublime.
Swallows squealing round, warm dappled sunlight filters down through the trees, it is lovely lovely lovely, I am very sad to have to leave, but I'm already looking forward to the next time , and the holidays not over just yet.
postman Posted by postman
31st August 2014ce

Treryn Dinas (Cliff Fort) — Fieldnotes

24 June 2014

The walk along the coast path from Carn les Boel is lovely one, rugged cliff tops dropping away to the blue-green below. At Gwennap Head basking sharks can sometimes be seen, but we don't have that privilege today.

It's an up-and-down section of path, dropping down to the tiny sandy beach at Porthgwarra (tea-shop), back up to exposed cliffs before a further drop to St Levan's Well above Porth Chapel. The well is worth a stop off, in its unusual position half way up the cliffs. From here it's a brief foray into tourist central near the famous Minack Theatre and the thronged beach at Porthcurno. From the cliffs above the Minack there is a great view of the day's final objective, the impossibly craggy headland of Treryn Dinas (pronounced "Treen").

We last came here about eight years ago, I only have a few crappy pictures and am keen to return - since then we've only seen the headland from a couple of boat trips, which reinforced just how startlingly rocky the site is. Along with its companion on the north coast, Gurnard's Head, this is the most impressive of the West Penwith cliff forts.

The defences are quite something. The outermost consist of a single, huge earthwork bank, several metres high in places. South of this is a flat area, quite overgrown now, before the central defences appear quite some way further south. These are formed of three lines of banks and ditches, much smaller in size than the outer rampart, but still providing a series of obstacles for any unwanted guests to negotiate. Beyond these, the ground slopes downwards towards a band of craggy granite outcrops. A sort-of path runs through the centre of these, taking the visitor along a ever-narrowing channel between the rocks. There is an easier route round to the west, but it would be interesting to know which was the original way in - perhaps one was the tradesman's entrance.

Once you've semi-scrambled over these, you are confronted with the narrowest point of the headland, where a ditch fronts another well-defined stone rampart, the innermost of the defences. Stone facing still lines the entrance through the centre of the bank. A circular round house (perhaps a guard house) originally existed at each end of this, but one has largely eroded away now.

Beyond this final earthwork, the tip of the headland is a wonder of jagged towers of granite. One of these is topped by the famed "Logan Rock", a rocking stone once toppled by sailors of the Royal Navy and re-erected at their expense following a public outcry. Quite right too.

I have a good scramble about in the rocks, although I don't manage to find a way up to the Logan Rock itself - I'm sure a longer visit would provide the answer to how to get up there, but it's quite exposed in places and the wind whips around the rocks, even on this sunny June day.

It's an amazing place here. Once beyond the innermost rampart, there's little that would suggest a nice place to live though. My speculative guess is that any occupation here took place further inland, within either the safety of the enormous outer earthwork or the central rows. Which leaves the question of why build a strongly defended rampart across the rocky tip of the headland. Perhaps someone important had their home here, or perhaps the headland was kept free of riff-raff for the inevitable "ritual purposes". My usually sceptical self can certainly imagine that here, as the wind gusts around the stone towers and the focal point of the Logan Rock itself, perched above it all.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
31st August 2014ce

Lansdown — Links

British Museum replica of Lansdown Sun disc


British Museum replica with the original very badly damaged disc.
moss Posted by moss
31st August 2014ce

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

What Lies Beneath Stonehenge?


The Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, is a four-year collaboration between a British team and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria that has produced the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, totaling more than four square miles. The results are astonishing. The researchers have found buried evidence of more than 15 previously unknown or poorly understood late Neolithic monuments: henges, barrows, segmented ditches, pits.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/what-lies-beneath-Stonehenge-180952437/?page=1&no-ist
Acheron Posted by Acheron
30th August 2014ce

Ty ar Chorriket (Arc-boutée) — Images

<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
30th August 2014ce

Stonehenge (Stone Circle) — News

Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found


From BBC News...

"Evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete has been found, because a hosepipe used to water the site was not long enough.

Parch marks in the grass, in an area that had not been watered, have revealed places where two "missing" huge sarsen stones may once have stood.

The marks were spotted by an English Heritage steward who alerted archaeologists to their existence.

Previous scientific techniques such as geophysics failed to find any evidence."

More here...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-28967538
1speed Posted by 1speed
30th August 2014ce

Ty ar Chorriket (Arc-boutée) — Images

<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman<b>Ty ar Chorriket</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
30th August 2014ce

La Loge Aux Loups (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman<b>La Loge Aux Loups</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
30th August 2014ce

Ashurst Lodge (Enclosure) — Fieldnotes

Stumbled on this small charming enclosure while ambling around the New Forest. It's not very big, popular with local bovine herds, probably no more than about 20-25m in diameter and the banks no more than 1.5m high (mostly on the southern side). I imagine in the winter months it's probably very boggy around here and the northern and eastern sides are bounded by the beginnings of the Beaulieu River which acts as a natural defence. Pastscape describes the earthwork as a Bronze Age enclosure or early Iron Age univalate Fort. I'd go for the former as the earthworks don't seem like they were ever defensive and more about preserving a bit of dry ground in a very flat area. There are also a number of (presumably) Bronze Age barrows nearby which might support that.

Another interesting feature about a mile to the west is Row Hill which has 3, or possibly 4, long mounds on top of it. These are quite substantial, the biggest being about 2m high and about 15m long all running parallel. I've no idea how old they might be and would hesitate to call them long barrows. WW1 activity in the forest might be one explanation for their presence as there are currently notice boards all over the place warning you against straying from the path due to unrecovered ordnance. After a hundred years - I ask you?!
A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
30th August 2014ce

Ashurst Lodge (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Ashurst Lodge</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
30th August 2014ce
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