The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Hill of Cruester, Bressay (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

20/09/2014 - A really fine standing stone. Visible from all around, it stands in peaceful loneliness on a small rise. I was very taken with it. thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th September 2014ce

Hill of Cruester, Bressay (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Hill of Cruester, Bressay</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Hill of Cruester, Bressay</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Hill of Cruester, Bressay</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th September 2014ce

Cruester (Burnt Mound / Fulacht Fia) — Images

<b>Cruester</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th September 2014ce

Anafon Valley cairns (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Anafon Valley cairns</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Anafon Valley cairns</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Anafon Valley cairns</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Anafon Valley cairns</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th September 2014ce

Foel Dduarth (west) (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Foel Dduarth (west)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foel Dduarth (west)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th September 2014ce

Foel Dduarth (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Foel Dduarth</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foel Dduarth</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foel Dduarth</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th September 2014ce

Carnedd y Saeson (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Carnedd y Saeson</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carnedd y Saeson</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carnedd y Saeson</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carnedd y Saeson</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carnedd y Saeson</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th September 2014ce

Chelmorton Low (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Chelmorton Low</b>Posted by stubob stubob Posted by stubob
18th September 2014ce

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Stonehenge's most intricate archaeological finds were 'probably made by children'


Some of the most high status pieces of prehistoric ‘bling’, prized by Stonehenge’s Bronze Age social elite, are likely to have been made by children, according to new research.

An analysis of objects, found near the ancient stone circle, shows that the ultra-fine craftwork involved such tiny components that only children or myopic (short-sighted) adults could have made them.

The research into the human eyesight optics of micro-gold-working in the Bronze Age has considerable implications for more fully understanding the nature of society in Western Europe some 4000 years ago.

“The very finest gold work involved the making and positioning of literally tens of thousands of tiny individually-made components, each around a millimetre long and around a fifth of a millimetre wide,” said David Dawson, Director of the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes where the world’s finest prehistoric micro-gold working achievements are on display as part of a major permanent exhibition of Bronze Age gold treasures.

“Only children and teenagers, and those adults who had become myopic naturally or due to the nature of their work as children, would have been able to create and manufacture such tiny objects,” said a leading authority on the optics of the human eye, Ronald Rabbetts, who has been assessing the human eyesight implications of Bronze Age micro-gold-working – implications that are examined in detail in a BBC Two documentary ‘Operation Stonehenge’, this evening, Thursday.
“The implication is that there would almost certainly have been a small section of the Bronze Age artisan class who, often as a result of their childhood work, were myopic for their adult life. They would therefore have been unable to do any other work apart from the making of tiny artefacts and would have had to be supported by the community at large,” he said.

The Stonehenge area object with the largest number of ultra-small gold components is a dagger made in around 1900 BC – and now on display in Devizes’ Wiltshire Museum. Crafted more than 1100 years before the invention of the first magnifying glass, the dagger’s 12 centimetre long handle was adorned with up to 140,000 tiny gold studs – each around a millimetre long and around 0.2 of a millimetre in diameter. Even the heads of each stud are just a third of a millimetre wide. They were set, with great manual dexterity and remarkable skill, into the surface of the wooden dagger handle - with more than a thousand studs neatly embedded in each square centimetre.

The prehistoric gold micro-working process appears to have had at least four stages. First, Bronze Age craftsmen manufactured lengths of extremely fine gold wire, almost as fine as a human hair. Then they flattened the end of a piece of wire to create the first stud-head – and cut the wire with a very sharp flint or obsidian razor a mere millimetre below the head. This delicate procedure was then repeated literarily tens of thousands of times – to decorate just one dagger handle! Next, a tiny bronze awl with an extremely fine point was used to create minute holes in the dagger handle in which to position the studs. Then a thin layer of tree resin was rubbed over the surface as an adhesive to keep the studs in place.

Each stud was then carefully placed into its miniscule hole – probably with the help of a very fine pair of bone or wooden tweezers, because the studs are too small to have been placed in position directly by the artisan’s fingers.

“We estimate that the entire operation – wire manufacture, stud-making, hole-making, resin pasting and stud positioning – would have taken at least 2500 hours to complete,” said David Dawson.

The dagger – and another probably less decorated similar weapon found with it – are believed to be the only such ultra-fine micro-worked artefacts to have survived from the prehistoric period anywhere in the world. But the high level of skill involved suggests that it was not a one-off creation, but was instead probably a product of a wider micro-gold-working tradition in at least part of Bronze Age western Europe. It is likely that the tradition was centred in Brittany in what is now western France.

It is also conceivable that Bronze Age craftsmen used comparable micro-working skills to create ultra-fine textiles.

The gold-studded daggers were discovered in 1808 inside Bush Barrow, a substantial Bronze Age burial mound, located almost a thousand metres from Stonehenge. However, it is only now that the eyesight and other human implications of its manufacture have been examined in detail.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/stonehenges-most-intricate-archaeological-finds-were-probably-made-by-children-9738993.html
moss Posted by moss
18th September 2014ce

Stoke Flat (Stone Circle) — Miscellaneous

"And back on the unchanging Flat of Stoke
Stand rugged stones in circle, whence the sun
The whole of day was seen, and where the stroke
Of sacrifice was at his rising done.
And out on Ramsley's brackened floor,
And high on Eyam's black barren moor,
And far o'er Offerton and all around
These olden temples stud the higher ground.
"

A verse from The Pride of the Peak by Ethel Bassett Gallimore (1926)
stubob Posted by stubob
17th September 2014ce

Dunanellerich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dunanellerich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunanellerich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunanellerich</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
17th September 2014ce

Dunanellerich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: September 3, 2014

Listed as a 'possible dun' by RCAHMS, the grass-covered mound of Dunanellerich is already prominent when viewed from the roadside beside the bus shelter at the south of Harlosh when loooking west towards the community of Dunanellerich. A walk of 300 metres or so will take you there.

There is little to see here. The mound itself is completely covered by grass, though stonework emerges intermittantly all around. Carnmore states that the site has been used as a stone quarry in the recent past, obscuring much of any detail that formerly existed.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
17th September 2014ce

Meuryn Isaf (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Meuryn Isaf</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Meuryn Isaf</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Meuryn Isaf</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Meuryn Isaf</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Meuryn Isaf</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th September 2014ce

Lanyon Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

I visited Lanyon Quoit on 7th December 2013 (apologies this isn't a recent visit) as part of a look around the Penwith area with my Father.

This was the first site we took a look at and I was blown away, all the pictures I had seen of it previously had left me expecting a site roughly as high as a kitchen table (why?)

It was a grey morning and the mist had not long lifted. Access to the site is very easy indeed and we spent a good bit of time hanging around this one checking it out from different angles, speculating on how it would have looked before being 'repaired' all those years ago.
Posted by Beebon
16th September 2014ce

Castle-an-Dinas (St. Columb) (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Castle-an-Dinas (St. Columb)</b>Posted by Beebon Posted by Beebon
16th September 2014ce

Castle-an-Dinas (St. Columb) (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Visited 09.09.2014.

As mentioned below, access to the site is very easily up a gracelly track with a small car park with a very short walk.

It was a beautiful evening when I visited, the evening sunshine was slightly hazy so my view from the tope of the site was restricted but it added a wonderful atmosphere.

The ramparts are imp[ressively well preserved and much bigger than I was expecting. I visited with my father and we had a good look around the place, only bumping into one other person.

Well worth checking this plce out!
Posted by Beebon
16th September 2014ce

Eire — News

Ancient remains found in Midlands bog


An ancient bog body has been discovered at a midland bog where a similar find was made two years ago.
The remains were found by a Bord na Móna worker at Rossan Bog on the Meath/Westmeath border on Saturday morning.
A Bord na Móna spokesman said: "The remains of a bog body were found in Rossan Bog two miles from Kinnegad on the Meath and Westmeath border."
The spokesman said the employee discovered the remains prior to beginning work and immediately put Bord na Móna's protocol in place.

More:
http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/0916/644192-bog-body/
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th September 2014ce

Garreg Fawr (Cup Marked Stone) — Images

<b>Garreg Fawr</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Garreg Fawr</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Garreg Fawr</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Garreg Fawr</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th September 2014ce

Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen</b>Posted by postman<b>Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen</b>Posted by postman<b>Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen</b>Posted by postman<b>Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen</b>Posted by postman<b>Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
16th September 2014ce

Emmets Post (Cairn(s)) — News

Public invited to see excavation of 4,000-year-old Bronze Age barrow on Dartmoor edge


Archaeologists are inviting the public to witness the excavation of a 4,000-year-old Bronze Age burial mound

Emmet's Post, named after one of several pillars built to divide Lee and Shaugh Moors in 1835, is being investigated as part of a government-approved quarry expansion on the edge of Dartmoor.

The mound of the post, on the boundaries of a china clay pit, was confirmed as a Bronze Age bowl barrow during a dig in 2011. Oxford Archaeology have been granted Scheduled Monument Consent by English Heritage in a bid to discover how the site was constructed and used over the centuries.

‘‘The barrow at Emmets Post, with its slightly hollowed-out top, is not the best-preserved of these Bronze Age monuments,” said Andrew Josephs, an archaeologist for Sibelco, the minerals firm paying for the project.

“The excavation has the potential to further characterise the full extent of the barrow and potential ditch, possibly identifying buried surface deposits and phased construction horizons.

“Environmental remains will add to the regional studies of the wooded prehistoric landscape that was very different to that today.”

Having offered a limited number of volunteer placements at the start of the project, which began on September 1 and will run until September 26, the team are inviting enthusiasts to enjoy an open day on Sunday (September 21), when experts will answer questions and discuss the Post’s history at the site.

Visitors can reach the barrow via a 1.5-mile unfenced single road track from Cadover Bridge. There is a small car park nearby, and waterproofs, warm clothes and stout footwear are recommended.

http://www.culture24.org.uk/history-and-heritage/archaeology/art499019-Public-invited-to-see-excavation-of-4000-year-old-bronze-age-barrow-on-dartmoor-edge
moss Posted by moss
16th September 2014ce

Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd) (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Twyn-y-Gaer (Mynydd Illtyd)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th September 2014ce
Showing 1-50 of 107,089 posts. Most recent first | Next 50