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Cortie Brae (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cortie Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cortie Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cortie Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cortie Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Memsie Burial Cairn (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Memsie Burial Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Memsie Burial Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Memsie Burial Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Strichen (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Strichen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Strichen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Strichen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Strichen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Strichen</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Grime's Graves (Ancient Mine / Quarry) — Folklore

The mound called 'Grimshoe' is at TL8190289813. It gave its name to the Hundred of Grimshoe - the name coming from 'Grim's Howe', or the burial mound of Grim (Woden / Odin). It's probably a spoil mound from the quarrying, or maybe created especially from the spoil for the purposes of a special place for impressive Hundred Meetings. But don't let its mundane origin detract from its mythological splendour. Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th December 2014ce

Aikey Brae (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Aikey Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Aikey Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Aikey Brae</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Auchmaliddie (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Auchmaliddie</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Auchmaliddie</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Auchmaliddie</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Auchmaliddie</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy) (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Glas (Mains of Kilcoy)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

West Cliff Barrow (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

Unremarkable as this site is in itself it does give a huge amount of context to the entire surrounding coastline. These barrows along the cliff top would have been clearly visible in the right weather conditions from both Hengistbury head and across from the Purbecks. I'm intrigued by the inter connectivity of sites like Rempstone circle and the coastal road from Corfe towards the ferry at Poole where all of this strip of Bournemouth is seen opposite, we're these barrows connected in some way with those sites. It brings another level of drama to see a barrow not just atop a prominent hill but crowning the headland itself.

Today though the site is much changed, thoroughly dug out, excavated almost completely obliterated into neatly clipped grass and an occasional bench to sit on and take in the view. If you take the time to sit on one of these benches however and look out then perhaps you can make the ancient landscape come alive again in your imagination.

(Do you have a grid reference, Texlahoma? At the moment it's coming up somewhere off the coast of France :) Thanks - TMA Ed.)
texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
18th December 2014ce

Mains of Kilcoy (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Mains of Kilcoy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th December 2014ce

Anstey Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

(SS 87342859) ANSTEY BARROW (NR) A round barrow 12.0m in diameter and 1.5m high, with no visible ditch. Mutilated in the centre and on the north side. Situated in moorland. (2)
SS 87357 28585. This barrow is situated at about 332m above OD on the eastern summit of East Anstey Common. The rather flattish ridge top is mainly covered by rough grass with a scattering of heather and bracken. The barrow does not appear to be scheduled (3a).
The barrow is evident as a turf, bracken and gorse-covered, flat-topped, earth and stone mound 9.5m in diameter and 1m in height. There is a central hollow, about 2m diameter and 0.7m deep accessed by the remains of an open `excavation' trench, from the ESE. The spoil has been dumped around the hollow and along both sides of the trench, raising the barrow height by some 0.4m. There are remains of a surrounding ditch and bank, about 1.5m wide and 0.7m high now in a very poor condition and best seen around the NW and NE. Elsewhere it has either gone, eroded or is hidden under the gorse around the southern arc.
Published survey accepted. (3-5)
A round barrow is visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs, centred on circa SS 87352858. The mound is roughly circular in shape, although appears slightly irregular in plan, measuring up to circa 11 metres in diameter. The central hollow is visible, but vegetation obscures any trace of surviving surrounding ditch or outer bank. (6-7)
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18th December 2014ce

Wiveliscombe Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[ST 00553486] Wiveliscombe Barrow (NR) Brompton Regis 2. Bowl barrow 23 paces diameter, 8' 6" high. (2)
A large well preserved bowl barrow 2.0m high. An excavation trench has recently been cut by an unknown person. See GP AO/65/182/5. Surveyed at 1:2500. (3)
ST 005348 Wiveliscombe Barrow, round barrow. Scheduled (4)ST 00563486. Brompton Regis 2. Wiveliscombe barrow listed, details as Auth 2. Visited by Grinsell 11th May 1952. He suspects that the name Wiveliscombe Barrow may possibly have been originated by the Ordnance Survey during the original survey of 1790-1810 for convenience of reference. It is named Eastern Barrow on the 1833 tithe map.
The Bronze Age bowl barrow described by the previous authorities was seen as an earthwork and mapped from aerial photographs. The excavation trench described by authority 3 was also visible. (6-7)
Wiveliscombe Barrow survives as a circular turf-covered mound 20.5 m in diameter and 2.3 m high. The barrow is well defined, and stands in the corner of an improved pasture field. Previous ploughing operations have cut into the base of the mound giving an abrupt end to the base of the scarp. Damage caused by ?sheep or animal burrowing has recently been repaired with patches of fresh soil. The excavation refered to by previous authorities is visible in the south-west quadrant of the barrow. It comprises a trench 7.8 m long by 2 m wide and 0.4 m deep. It runs south-west to north-east. Field visit as part of RCHME's Exmoor Project, 12 March 1999. (8)
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18th December 2014ce

Periton Hill Barrows (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrows on Pastscape

SS 94844423. Minehead 1.
SS 94874422. Minehead 2.

Two bowl barrows on Periton Hill listed, both 11 paces diameter and 2ft high. Minehead 2 has had the south side impinged upon and destroyed by a trackway. Visited by Grinsell in May 1967 when under heath. "These two barrows seem to be shown on OS 2in MS Map c 1809" (What Grinsell refers to is the 2" drawing of 1802-3, where an ambiguous feature is shown at this location but appears to be on the south side of a trackway. Nothing is shown here on OS 1" first edition 1809. (1) Grinsell's Minehead 1 is clearly visible at SS 9484 4423, 15 m north of the OS triangulation pillar. It comprises a turf-covered mound 0.5 m high and 12 m in diameter. A modern path runs over its south side, and here beside the path a bench has been placed on the barrow. The northern part is currently in dense scrub, comprising silver birch, brambles, gorse and heather. Grinsell's Minehead 2 could not be located. Minehead 1 surveyed at 1:2500 scale, July 1997. (2)
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18th December 2014ce

Staddon Hill Barrows (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrows on Pastscape

[A] SS 88383718. A round barrow 18 paces diameter and 3ft high.[B] SS 88403716. Round barrow 11 paces diameter, 1.5ft high. (1)
Two barrows first reported by Leslie Grinsell in 1967 (see source 1 above). The sites do not appear to have been published in his `Somerset Barrows' of 1969. (2)The two barrows are centred at SS 8840 3715 on the saddle of Staddon Hill. They lie in improved pasture fields and are no more than 20 m apart (centre to centre).SS 88392 37160 (`A' on OS 1:10,000 record map). A prominent, dome-like, circular, earthen mound 16.5 m in diameter and 0.7 m high. SS 88407 37146 (`B' on OS 1:10,000 record map). A circular earthen mound 10.8 m in diameter and 0.4 m high. Surveyed at 1:2500 scale, 16th September 1997. (3)
Two Bronze Age round barrows can be seen on aerial photographs as low earthworks on Staddon Hill. The larger, westernmost of the two, is clearly visible on aerial photographs as a mound circa 16 metres in diameter centred on circa SS 88383716. The second, smaller earthwork, discernible only as a very subtle feature circa 10 metres in diameter, at circa SS 88403714. The earthworks have probably been significantly denuded by post-medieval agricultural improvements, visible immediately to the east as narrow ridge and furrow. (4)
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18th December 2014ce

Ricksy Ball Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

Details of Stone on Pastscape

SS 73843870. An isolated single stone on Ricksy Ball. It is of slate or shale, now leaning and is 0.32m wide and 0.17m high. Found 31-4-90
(Ground photograph supplied) (1).
Not investigated: although isolated, other similar stones occur on Ricksy Ball, all of which appear to be natural surface stones or `outcrop' (2).
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18th December 2014ce

Sherdon Barrows (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrows on Pastscape

Four bowl barrows not published by OS:- Exmoor No.20, SS 79193550, is 19 paces diameter and 2 ft high, and has a hollow in the centre. Exmoor Nos. 21a and b, adjoining mounds at SS 79243549. 21a, the NE mound, is 7 paces diameter by 1.5ft. high and is ditched. 21b, the SW mound, is 7 paces diameter by 2.5 ft.high and is also ditched. Exmoor No 22, SS 79413548, is mutilated and was first discovered from A.Ps. It is 11 paces in diameter and 2ft high. (1)
Grinsell's No. 20, at SS 79213554 is a truncated bowl barrow 0.6m high. 22, at SS 79433548, has been almost completely destroyed. A small oval mound 0.6 m high is all that remains though the original extent of the barrow can be traced as a crop mark. Surveyed at 1/2500.
21a and b, at SS 79253552 are both small square mounds enclosed by a slight ditch. They do not seem to be of any great age and may be drying platforms associated with peat digging (2)
Exmoor 20 and 22. Bowl barrows listed, details as Authy 1. Visited by Grinsell 27th Sept 1961 and 23rd April 1962. Known as Sherdon Barrows(together with SS 73 NE 4), and so called in Chase records of 1794 and1819(a).Exmoor 21a and 21b. Listed as 'doubtful or rejected'. (3)
(SS 79213554) Tumulus (NR)(SS 79433548) Tumulus (NR) (4)
Grinsell No 20, centred at SS 7921 3554 on open moorland, consists of a truncated, turf & reed-covered stony mound 16.5m in diameter (summit diameter of 13m) and 0.4m high.A narrow slot has been driven through the south edge and opens out into a rectangular pit, measuring 3.5m by 6.5m and 0.4m deep, to the south of the centre of the mound. This, and the truncated form of the mound are the result of stone robbing activity.
Grinsell No 22, centred at SS 7943 3548 in improved pasture, consists of a turf-covered oval mound measuring 7.3m north-south by 9.5m and 0.3m high. Around the mound is a swathe of disturbed ground which probably corresponds with the "cropmark" mentioned by source 2. This presumably represents the former extent of the barrow, and would have given a diameter of 13.2m.
The possible peat drying platforms, mentioned by source 2, are centred at SS 7925 3552. They consist of a pair of adjacent turf covered mounds enclosed within a shallow ditch. The eastern, flat-topped mound is rectangular, measuring 6.2m by 7.3m and 0.4m high. The western mound is sub-circular and measured 6.3m in diameter and is 0.5m high. The two mounds are separated by a shallow ditch. Both lie within a rectangular area measuring 15.5m by 8.5m and defined by a sharp-sided ditch 1m wide and 0.3m deep. The purpose of the mounds is unclear. The sharpness of the enclosing ditch suggests a Post-Medieval date.
Source 2's classification as peat drying mounds is unfounded. Local information (source 7) states that peat was never dried on mounds or platforms within memory. Source 8 suggests that on Bodmin Moor where similar features have been identified and so classified, the mounds represent peat charcoal production sites. However, there is no known documentary evidence for peat charcoal production on Exmoor. (6-8)
The mounds described above are clearly visible on aerial photographs, although only one small sub-rectangular square (identified as a peat stand) can be seen. It is clearly very different in size and form to the larger barrows at SS 7921 3554 and SS 7943 3548. The mounds lie in an area of extensive peat cutting, and it is possible that the sub-rectangular mound is related to this activity (9).
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18th December 2014ce

Longcombe Burrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

SS 804433 (approx) Exmoor 27, Longcombe Burrow shown on map of 1819 (in Authy 2). If correctly marked it is on the Exmoor/Oare boundary, but Exmoor 11 (SS 84 SW 19) is not far away. (1)
In the perambulation of September 1815 the boundary is described as proceeding in "an easterly direction along several Boundary Stones through a place called Lannicombe Burrows (SS 84 SW 46) to a Boundary Stone in the centre of a Burrow called Long Comb Burrow" (2). The barrow is shown on a map of 1816 (in Authy 3) on the Oare Common boundary about half-way between Badgworthy Water and Toms Hill Corner but MacDermot (2) states that it has "entirely vanished". The material was probably used during construction of the forest wall (a wall around the boundary of the former Exmoor Forest was constructed in 1820-4). (2-3)
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18th December 2014ce

Hurdle Down Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

SS "83954210 roughly". Exford 6. Bowl barrow. Hurdle Down Barrow, shown on 1846 Tithe Map of Almsworthy Common, field No 33. Noted by At Wicks before 1939 when the map as at Taunton Castle.
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18th December 2014ce

Brightworthy Barrows (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrows on Pastscape

A group of three barrows, only two of which survive as visible earthworks. The third was destroyed in 1913 to provide stone for road building. The easternmost barrow survives as an earth and stone rim about 0.5 metres high with an average width of 6 metres. An irregularly shaped mound lies within the rim. This mound has a maximum diameter of 12.5 metres and stands 1.4 metres high. It is topped by an OS triangulation pillar. The rim is surrounded by an outer ditch which is visible on the south eastern side as a shallow depression. The second barrow lies to the west and is visible as a slight ring bank 4.2 metres wide, up to 0.75 metres high and with a maximum overall diameter of 19 metres. This encloses an uneven, slightly raised area of ground which represents the remains of the bowl barrow mound.
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18th December 2014ce

Setta Barrow (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

A bowl barrow visible as a turf-covered earth and stone mound of 2.8m maximum height. The diameter varies between 31.4m and 17m. Untypically for Exmoor it has a retaining kerb which has been robbed on the eastern side. The barrow has been robbed or "excavated" from the SE, the spoil form which has been dumped on the summit creating a false top. Surrounding the barrow there are traces of a ditch about 2.5m to 3m wide and 0.1m in depth. The barrow is crossed by an enclosure wall which marks the county boundary between Devon and Somerset. The barrow was alleged to have a trig point inserted but there is no immediate evidence for this.
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17th December 2014ce

Old Barrow (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[SS 84153241] Old Barrow (NR) Withypoole No 7, a bowl barrow 13 paces diameter and 2.5 ft. high with a hollow in the centre. It is enclosed by a bank with outer ditch which is not concentric with the barrow and is clearly a tree-clump enclosure, probably 18th century. (2)Scheduled. (3)
Old Barrow is at SS 84083244, the feature has been omitted from the OS6 inch and the name erroneously applied to a pit. It appears to be a very robbed bowl barrow, 0.9m high the bank mentioned by Grinsell is not well defined and has only slight traces of an outer ditch. Although clearly later than the barrow it is not certainly a tree-ring, and it may have been formed when the barrow was robbed. (See GPs AO/65/192/5 & 6).Published 1:2500 survey revised. (4)SS 84093244. Withypoole 7. Old Barrow listed, details as Authy 2.Visited by Grinsell 25th May 1958. (5)
[SS 84083244] Old Barrow (NR) (6)
Old Barrow, a prehistoric barrow, is centred at SS 84083244 at the eastern end of the ridge forming Old Barrow Down. It is a circular earth and stone mound, 20.9m in diameter and 1.2m high and has been heavily disturbed by robbing or excavation trenches. These appear as two, sharp-sided, concentric circular cuttings 1.5m wide and 0.3m deep. Their shallowness suggests that they are less likely to be stone robbing trenches and more likely to be the result of an antiquarian attempt to define a kerb within the monument. Such an event does not appear to be documented but has been noted elsewhere on Exmoor (see SS 83 SW 2 and SS 73 NW 10 (D)).
Aspect: Old Barrow has extensive views in all directions.Vegetation: Grass with some reeds. (7)
The probable Bronze Age round barrow known as Old Barrow is clearly visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs of the 1940s onwards.On the aerial photographs available to the survey the monument can be seen as a mound circa 10 metres in diameter with evidence of disturbance visible as an off-centre pit about 4.5 metres in diameter. The mound appears to be enclosed by a narrow bank which in turn is surrounded by a ditch less than 1.5 metres wide, and finally an outer bank. It is possible these are also evidence of antiquarian disturbance as suggested by authority 7 above. (8-11)
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17th December 2014ce

Knackers Hole Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of Cairn on Pastscape

[ST 1572 3970] TUMULUS [GT] Descending Dowsborough in its direction of Holford, is a large cairn lying on the slope to the right of the green path. It is surrounded by a shallow trench. (2)
(13) A ruined cairn with two recent stone heaps in middle. Low mound enclosed by ditch and outer bank. Query whether saucer barrow or steading of an outpost to the hillfort. Overall 19 paces x 3/4 ft. (3)
This is a robbed cairn. The unsurveyable traces of a ditch and outer bank seem to have resulted from robbing stone from just within the rim and thereby producing a shallow trench. The cairn is 0.4m high excluding the modern stone heaps.Surveyed at 1/2500. (4)
The possible Bronze Age round barrow or cairn, described by the previous authorities, survives as earthworks on a slope overlooking Knacker's Hole. It is visible on aerial photographs as an amorphous mound, with a diameter of 14.5m, surrounded by a ring ditch with a diameter of 19m. The cairn appears to have been dug into, possibly for stone, and some of the material from the mound appears to have been dumped over the ditch. It is situated amid a Medieval and/or Post Medieval field system (ST 13 NE 98)but it is unclear if it has ploughed around or over.
(5-7)An embanked platform cairn lies at the head of an un-named combe, above Knackers Hole, at ST 1572 3970. The cairn comprises a circular, flat-topped mound, 19m in diameter and 0.8m high, with an incomplete bank around its periphery. The interior of the site is rather disturbed, but the mound, 4m in diameter and 0.8m high in the south of the interior is most likely to an original feature.
The site was recorded at a scale of 1:200 using graphic methods as part of the EH survey of the Quantock Hills AONB (8).
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17th December 2014ce

Cutcombe (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[SS 96493571) Cutcombe Barrow (NR). Brompton Regis No.1, a bowl barrow 23 paces diameter and 3.5 ft.high. (2)
This is a bowl barrow 1.3 m. high. Surveyed at 1/2500. (3)
SS 96503571. Brompton Regis 1. Cutcombe Barrow listed, details as Authy 2. Visited by Grinsell 10th May 1952. He suspects that the name Cutcombe Barrow may possibly have been originated by the OrdnanceSurvey during the original survey of 1790-1810 for convenience of referece. It is named Western Barrow on the 1838 tithe map (but the present name appears on OS 1" first edition 1809). (4)
The barrow known as Cutcombe Barrow lies at the edge of a pasture field, and measures 22 m in diameter and 1.7 m high. It comprises a smoothed grass covered mound. On its eastern side the hedgebank clips the edge of the barrow and several large quartz blocks are visible on the ground. (5)
The remains of the Bronze Age bowl barrow described by the previous authorities was seen as an earthwork and mapped from aerial photographs. (6)
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17th December 2014ce

Leather Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

Bowl barrow, known as Leather Barrow, on Withiel Hill. The earth and stone barrow mound measures 23 metres in diameter and 3.3 metres high. It stands at the junction of three boundary banks which form the remains of a field system (NMR 1128212) of possible post medieval date and may have been used as a point of alignment during the construction of the banks. The boundary which runs south from the junction forms part of the Luxborough and Treborough parish boundary.
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17th December 2014ce
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