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Castle-an-Dinas (St. Columb) (Hillfort) — News

Castle An Dinas


PDF Reoprt on Management and Restoration of Hillfort - illustrated by Jane Stanley.

http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-1062-1/dissemination/pdf/cornwall2-102150_1.pdf
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
21st August 2014ce

Jane Stanley Paints Castle An Dinas


Follow link to see the artwork.

http://www.strangehistory.net/2014/08/21/jane-stanley-paints-castle-dinas/

Jane Stanley is an extremely talented archaeological reconstruction artist, based out of Cornwall. Castle-an-Dinas is an Iron Age fort in the middle of that county, a six-acre site second only, in terms of its natural charisma, to South Cadbury in Somerset. Put Jane and Castle-an-Dinas together and you get some of the best historical fiction around, though historical fiction by brush stroke.

Cornwall Council commissioned Jane to do a series of paintings of Castle-an-Dinas. What makes this series (to the best of my knowledge) unique is that they are not just different aspects of the site (a deer kill, a burial, a hosting…) They are the site over perhaps twenty five centuries. We put them up here with a link to Jane’s facebook page, hoping that neither she nor Cornwall Council will send a cease and desist order: they are available in a pdf online; also given the quality of Jane’s work we take pleasure in pointing out a recent book, A Brush with the Past. Beach’s credit card has presently maxed out but as soon as everything is back up and functioning… The image at the head of the post shows the creation of the two bronze age tombs at the head of Dinas: the second picture immediately below shows, instead, the Iron Age fort that followed on. As is typical of these sites the Iron Age was all too happy to leave the Bronze Age in place. The stronghold was crowned by two tombs from centuries before.

So far this is the normal fare of archeaeological art (albeit it at the best end of the market). Now though we turn to more recent times. In the first days of March 1645 a mauled Royalist army camped out in old Iron Age vallum. Cornwall was an overwhelmingly Royalist area, but here the decision was made to surrender. The fight was impossible by this date and two days later the Royal Standard was given up to the Parliamentarians at Bodmin: a black day. Britain would labour under the ‘Protector’ for fifteen wasted years.

The next picture is a curiosity. Cornwall is mining country, but it was not until Britain’s straitened circumstances in the First World War that the decision was made to sink a shaft here in search of Wolfram of all things. Love the combination of Edwardian industrial might and Iron Age landscape.

Then my favourite picture of them all. In the 1960s a Pennsylvanian archaeologist, Bernard Wailes carried out a multi-year professional dig at the site. Bizarrely, though this sometimes happens in archaeology, he never got his act together to actually publish the findings. There were two brief notes in a Cornish journal. Castle-An-Dinas waits another archaeological hero, preferably one though that has time to dig and write.

Here are the pictures that Jane missed or that Cornwall Council did not commission. First, there are Arthurian rumours about the fort: a bit of desperate Romano-British sheltering might have been fun. Second, the fort was used by smugglers in the modern period: barrels being rolled out of the way of excise? Third, there are reports of great furze fires in the modern period at night. By all accounts the whole countryside could see Castle-an-Dinas in flames for miles around.
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
21st August 2014ce

Knockatotaun (Portal Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Knockatotaun</b>Posted by bogman bogman Posted by bogman
21st August 2014ce

Askillaun (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Askillaun</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Askillaun</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Askillaun</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
21st August 2014ce

Paussac (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Paussac</b>Posted by texlahoma texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
21st August 2014ce

Grotte de Villars (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Images

<b>Grotte de Villars</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Grotte de Villars</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Grotte de Villars</b>Posted by texlahoma texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
21st August 2014ce

Merryton Low I (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Merryton Low I</b>Posted by BrownEdger<b>Merryton Low I</b>Posted by BrownEdger BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
21st August 2014ce

The Auctioneers Mound (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>The Auctioneers Mound</b>Posted by BrownEdger<b>The Auctioneers Mound</b>Posted by BrownEdger BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
21st August 2014ce

Mané Rutuel (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st August 2014ce

Robin Hood's Stride (Rocky Outcrop) — Folklore

"An unfrequentd path of another quarter of a mile led us to the base of Mock Beggar Hall, a curious assemblage of sand-stone rocks thrown confusedly together, yet so arranged as to form at a distance a strong resemblance to a regular building, with a huge chimney at each extremity; hence the name which this mass of rocks has obtained: the stony towers at each end are called Robin Hood's Stride."

'Peak Scenery or The Derbyshire Tourist' by Ebenezer Rhodes 1824.
stubob Posted by stubob
21st August 2014ce

Mané Rutuel (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st August 2014ce

Gardom's Enclosure — Folklore

"The story was that 'Meg' the witch or fortuneteller, was driven out of the village and lived near this wall, or near the Nelson Monument, and that the wall was named after her. But 'Meg' is probably one of the usual excuses offered in clerical-medieval days to explain away the credit for remarkable works made by primitive, or pagan, man...........'Meg' however, is also Greek for big, or great, i.e megalith for big stone.

From the 'Sheffield Clarion Ramblers' 1942-3 by G.H.B Ward.
stubob Posted by stubob
21st August 2014ce

Hirst Stones (site) — Miscellaneous

"In our walk to Matlock, we passed along the side of the hill to Riber Top, where a singular assemblage of stones, supposed to have been originally a druidical altar; some antiquaries say, a cromlech, which appears more probable: they are called Hirst Stones, and are not unworthy of a visit; since those who feel no interest in these ancient relics will be amply repaid for the toil and trouble of ascending this eminence by the prospect it commands"



From 'Peak Scenery or The Derbyshire Tourist' 1824 by Ebenezer Rhodes.
stubob Posted by stubob
21st August 2014ce

Gowlane North (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Gowlane North</b>Posted by bogman bogman Posted by bogman
21st August 2014ce

Derrynafinchin (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Derrynafinchin</b>Posted by bogman bogman Posted by bogman
21st August 2014ce

Mains of Clava SE (Clava Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited 25.7.14

Whilst Karen was putting the children back in the car I took the opportunity to have a quick look at this cairn. Access to the field is over a metal field gate.

The site is completely neglected and overgrown. The stones are small and well hidden by the long grass, brambles, bushes etc.

Unless/until this site has been cleared I couldn’t recommend a visit.
Posted by CARL
21st August 2014ce

Clava Cairns — Fieldnotes

Visited 25.7.14

The famous Clave Cairns is a place I had long wanted to visit so it was with more than a little excitement that we followed the sign posts and pulled up in the car park. Despite my prompting Karen decided to stay in the car and keep an eye on the sleeping Sophie whilst myself and Dafydd went exploring.

What amazed me was that despite the weather being fantastic there was no one here – we had the place to ourselves!

We crossed the road, went through the gate and were soon face-to-face with the first of the cairns (the northern one). Each cairn had its own information board. The stones around the cairn reminded me of a mini Ring of Brodger for some reason. The two tall stones at the entrance were most impressive. Dafydd said he could count 25 cup marks on the stone. Who am I to argue?

The second (middle) cairn was very interesting with the stone ‘rows’ radiating out from its centre. What does it all mean? Unfortunately someone had decided to have a BBQ in the centre of the cairn. What is wrong with these people? A very tall standing stone stood nearby.

The third (southern) cairn was similar to its northern counterpart. An impressive circle of tall stones surrounded the cairn (part of which was cut through by the adjacent road). This cairn also has cup and ring marked stones. Close by is a small kerbed cairn with a cup marked stone.

These cairns within its woodland setting is a pure delight and it goes without saying that this is a ‘must see’.

On our way back to the car we met a middle aged couple who had brought dowsing rods with them. I asked them if they would mind if we had a go? They were both very nice and were only too happy to help. The lady explained about dowsing to Dafydd and I told her of my previous experience of dowsing. Dafydd’s rod mainly span around in circles whilst mine (oddly enough) led me into the northern cairn. I beckoned Karen out of the car to have a go – which she did. When Karen took hold of her rod it led her from tree to tree, completely ignoring any of the stones – I am sure that says something! As we were leaving a mini bus arrived and several people got out. They seemed intrigued by the dowsing rods and were soon having a go themselves! (the lady had gone back to her car and brought out several more rods from her boot)

My expectation level for the Clava Cairns was high as I had previously read so much about them.
I am pleased to report that I was not disappointed. This is a great (and very easy) site to visit and should be on everyone’s ‘must see’ list.
Posted by CARL
21st August 2014ce

Mains of Clava SW (Ring Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited 25.7.14

Completely ruined. Now no more than a grass covered mound of stones in the field opposite the car park.

Don’t bother.
Posted by CARL
21st August 2014ce

Achonry (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Achonry</b>Posted by bogman bogman Posted by bogman
21st August 2014ce

Lower Camster (Stone Row / Alignment) — Fieldnotes

Visited 24.7.14

Directions:
About 1 mile further north of the famous Grey Cairns of Camster.
Just keep heading up the road and you will see the standing stones on your right.


My O/S map shows three standing stones but I could only spot 2 of them amid the tall spiky grass – both of which are visible from the road although not obvious.

The adjacent wind turbines dominate the area.

Whilst searching around for the ‘missing’ stone I was constantly surrounded by a mass of flies. Perhaps they were after the salt in my sweat on this hot, sticky day. Or perhaps I just smelt!

I was planning on having a look at the nearby broch but unfortunately ran out of time.


CANMORE state:
‘Three small stone slabs stand in heather moorland immediately E of the minor road from Watten to Lybster. The southernmost stands immediately E of the road and measures 0.8m in height by 0.22m in thickness – there is an O/S bench-mark on its SSE face. The second stone, which also stands immediately E of the road, measures 0.5m in height and 0.4m in thickness. The northernmost stone measures 0.8m in height by 0.25m in thickness’.
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Corrimony (Clava Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited 22.7.14

Directions:
Sign posted off the A831 – Historic Scotland site


We had been very fortunate with the weather with day after day of blue skies and the odd white fluffy cloud. However, today it was too hot – that’s something that doesn’t happen very often in Scotland! We had spent the afternoon at Urquhart Castle on the banks of Loch Ness but had to come away as it was so hot the children (and us) were starting to suffer.

We made our way to Corrimony with the windows closed and the air conditioning on. Sophie was complaining that she wasn’t feeling well and we had to stop a couple of times. It was a fair drive from Loch Ness but we eventually arrived at the designated car park.

Myself and Dafydd took the short walk to the site whilst Karen stayed with Sophie who was still not very well. As you would expect there were many, many people at the Historic Scotland ‘cash cow’ that is Urquhart Castle and yet at this Historic Scotland site we were the only visitors!

The cairn is in a very peaceful spot and we counted 12 stones – 2 of which are split and 1 now only a stump. We also counted over 20 cup marks on the cap stone although the bright glare of the sun was far from ideal.

After we had been there for a while another couple arrived. I decided it was their turn to have the place to themselves. I was planning on walking to Mony’s Stone but Sophie was still poorly (I think she was suffering from heat stroke) and it was way too hot to expect her to wait for me in the car – so I decided to give it a miss. Perhaps next time?

This is a great place to come and I would thoroughly recommend a visit if you are in the area.
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Grey Cairns of Camster (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 24.7.14

Directions:
5m north of Lybster on the A9 – sign posted. Historic Scotland site.


The road taking you from the A9 to Camster is a bit like ‘the road to nowhere’.
This is certainly a remote area but, of course, that’s what gives it its charm. It was no surprise that we didn’t pass a single person or vehicle on the way to the cairns.

The grey stones of the cairns stand out against the green grass and their bulk is easily seen from the road (on the left) – you would have trouble not spotting them!

Upon parking Sophie and Dafydd excitedly put on their head lights and we walked out across the wooden board walk towards the first cairn – the one on the left. When we arrived at the cairn the metal gate at the entrance was closed but thankfully not locked. Sophie insisted on taking the lead and Dafydd followed her. I took up the rear. Although the children found no trouble in accessing the chamber I found ‘waddling’ a bit of a struggle – I must be getting old!

We then continued along the boardwalk to the larger cairn which has two low and narrow entrance passages. This is the cairn which also has the reconstructed horned forecourt – which is rather splendid. I must admit that I also found it far from easy ‘waddling’ along these passages but with Sophie’s ‘help’ I eventually managed it. It would probably have been much easier to have simply crawled along the passage ways but that would have been a rather muddy experience!

As with all intact burial chambers (and caves for that matter) once inside and sat in quiet isolation the place takes on a ‘timeless’ characteristic. Time seems to stop.

These are cracking site to visit and comes highly recommended. The highest compliment I can give the cairns is that it wouldn’t look out of place in Orkney.

This is a ‘must see’ if you find yourself in the far north east of Scotland.
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Achcheargary (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
Immediately south of the Dalmor cairns on the B871


The weather was glorious and after pulling over onto the grass verge I hopped over the metal field gate and headed towards the chambered cairn. A farmer was in the next field harvesting his crop and he didn’t seem concerned about me being there.

Despite being in the far north of Scotland with its miles upon miles of bleak (in a nice sort of way) moorland this glen is surprisingly well cultivated.

Although ruined, the cairn still has two stones stood upright and a 3rd stone laying flat on the ground. There are many stones sticking out of the grass.

This is a lovely spot for a cairn, overlooking a bend in the river Naver.

When I got back to the car Karen was looking through my binoculars and pointing. There, on a nearby telegraph pole was a large eagle. Wow, what a sight! You just have to love Scotland.

If you are in the area checking out the many prehistoric sites along the B871 / parallel minor road then you could do worse than to visit this one. Not a huge amount to see but the setting s delightful.


CANMORE state:
‘A natural knoll which has been enhanced to form a central cairn, identified by a scattering of stones over an area with a diameter of 24m. Three large flat elongated stone slabs provide evidence of a chamber’
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Achargary (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
Immediately south of Achcheargary chambered cairn on the B871 - off the A836 near Bettyhill.


Not sure if I spotted these cairns or not?
The area is 'lumpy bumpy' rough grass with a couple of possible contenders for the cairns seen - although nothing obvious.


CANMORE state:
Cairns 'A' and 'B' are on the old river terrace at the west side of the River Naver.
'A' is completely turf-covered. It is visible as a platform measuring 12.5m NE-SW by 11.5m with a peripheral, ragged ridge of rubble 0.2m high and 1.5m spread.
'B' is a stony mound adopting a level stance and measuring approximately 15.5m diameter; the body content is low and much disturbed. Intruding in the west sector is a circular depression.
Revised at 1:10,000.
Visited by OS (J M) 25 June 1977.

NC 7198 5489 Circular enclosure/?cairn A (NC75SW 2). The middle of the three 'cairns' already recorded, this feature comprises a circular earth bank, 1m wide and variable in height from 0.1-0.3m, enclosing an area with an internal diameter of 9m. There may be an entrance in the SE.
Full report deposited in Highland SMR
Sponsor: NOSAS
M Marshall 2002
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Dalmor (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
About 2 miles south of the A836 on the western side of the B871


Couldn’t see a thing. The whole area was covered in chest high ferns.
Only chance of spotting this is to come in the winter.


CANMORE state:
Two heavily-robbed cairns with short cists.
'A' is 13m in diameter and 1m high with a central cists complete with coverstone, and about 3m to the north, a cavity which suggests the former existence of a second cist. In February 1938 the cairn was being used as a quarry for road metal, and in subsequent sifting of the material which had been thrown out, most of a jet necklace and a jet button were recovered, and are now in the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland [NMAS]. (Acc No. FN 176).
'B' has measured 13.4.m in diameter but its southern segment has been entirely destroyed. A single slab on edge near the centre denotes the position of a probable cist. 1960
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Skelpick Long (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
Just north of Skelpick, off the A836 at Bettyhill.
Along the same road but further south of Achcoillenaborgie broch.


I found this site to be more difficult than I was expecting. Firstly, you cannot see the chamber from the road. We pulled over at approximately the right place on the map and I headed east.

After crossing the barbed wire fence I had to weave my way through chest high ferns and gorse. Despite the (almost) tropical weather the ground was very bogy. It must be very wet in ‘normal’ Scottish summer weather!

I eventually located the river / bridge and then had to cross a second barbed wire fence.
In reality it is only a 10 minute walk from the road but it’s not an easy 10 minute walk – at least not the way I went!

The inside of chamber was completely overgrown, to the extent that it was difficult to climb inside. There was no chance of crawling under the remaining capstone.

It is obvious that this site receives few visitors – which is hardly surprising. In my humble opinion I would say you would be better off visiting Coille Na Borgie as not only is it much easier to access but it is also in better condition.
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Auchinlochy (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
Immediately south (but on the other side of the road) of Achcoillenaborgie broch.


Although close to the road this cairn was difficult to access. I had to make my way through chest high ferns and over a barbed wire fence.

There are many stones sticking out of the grass and fern covered mound.
Not much else I can add really.

The cairn occupies a prominent position in the glen.

CANMORE state:
‘A prominent turf-covered cairn on the summit of a ridge, measuring 11m in diameter and 1.2m high’
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

Achcoillenaborgie (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
About 1km down a minor road off the A836 (signposted Skelpick)
A short distance south of Bettyhill.


There is a small parking area and an information board and a sign proclaiming this to be site ‘Strathnaver Trail 11’.
(Well done to whoever set up this trail)

A ‘path’ has been cut through the ferns and a short walk will soon bring you out to a large pile of stones which is all that remains of this ruined broch. Much of the mound of stones is covered by fern. I couldn’t make out any of the details described by the CANMORE report.

The broch is in a prominent position and affords good views along the glen.

Worth a look when visiting the (better) chambered cairns which run along the road.


CANMORE state:
The remains of a broch, set on a low knoll. The north section is severely denuded and the entrance passage is not visible although the chamber survives. In the northern arc are traces of a dry stone chamber, partly built into the broch wall. To the SW lies a circular rubble-walled enclosure, 7.2m in diameter with no visible entrance, whose period is uncertain. Remains of a ditch, partly accompanied by an outer bank, curve around the broch on the north and west’.
Posted by CARL
20th August 2014ce

The Chesters (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Visited 30.7.14

We followed the signs and parked in the small parking area next to the approach road to the farm. A sign states that the parking area closes at 6.30pm in summer and 4.30pm in winter.

The weather was bright although there were dark, threatening rain clouds on the horizon. The children were asleep in the car so I followed the path to the hillfort alone.
The path runs parallel to the farm access road before crossing a small field of cows and the start of the outer ramparts. (200m walk)

The information board states that the hillfort is unexcavated which I found surprising.

There are many stones sticking out of the grass on the ramparts which no doubt is what the banks were originally made up of. The site is large but not huge and it doesn’t take long to walk around the entire perimeter.

There are good coastal views and in the distance Arthur’s Seat can be seen. Nearby Traprain Law stood out like a beacon as it was lit up by the evening sunshine.

On my way back to the car a family arrived with two young children. It is always nice to see children being shown these ancient sites and they will (hopefully) gain a better understanding of their forebears and an appreciation of the importance of these special places.

This is a very easy hillfort to access and is well worth a visit if in the area.
Another Historic Scotland site knocked off the list!
Posted by CARL
19th August 2014ce

Gansclet (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Visited 24.7.14

Directions:
From Thrumster on the A99 take the minor road south east towards Sarclet.
The stone can be seen in a field on your right (west).


There is (or at least should) be a convenient ‘path’ between two fields/fences which leads directly from the road to the standing stone. I say ‘should’ as the farmer clearly doesn’t want people using this ‘path’ as he/she has used barbed wire to try to prevent access.
However, this being Scotland with its ‘right to roam’….. although I didn’t hang around long!

The standing stone is a good one; tall, grey stone on a small rise giving wide views across the countryside.

Well worth the short detour off the A99 when in the far north of Scotland. I am surprised no one has posted about this stone before.


CANMORE state:
‘This standing stone is situated on a low rise in area of rough pasture 185m NNW of Acorn Cottage. The stone is a slab of sandstone measuring 1.15m in breadth and stands at least 2.55m in height, though the top of the stone may have been broken off. The stone was broken near its base and re-erected in the late 19thC, being held in place by large slabs which have been driven into the ground at the foot of its E and W faces’.
Posted by CARL
19th August 2014ce

Coille na Borgie (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.7.14

Directions:
From Bettyhill on the A836 take the minor road south towards Skelpick. The cairn can be seen on the left (east) side of the road after about 1 mile. There is a small parking area with a sign which states ‘Strathnaver Trail 12’ and an adjacent information board.


The information board states that these are two long cairns (between 4,400 and 6,000 years BP) cut through by a cart track. A ‘path’ has been cut through the ferns taking you from the road to the cairns. Dafydd and I opted to go exploring whilst Karen and Sophie were content to watch Peppa Pig on the DVD player!

There is not too much to say about the northern cairn. It has been ruined and now only has one stone standing. The ruined cairn is covered in broken glass, bottles, rubbish and rust pieces of metal. What a shames.


The southern cairn is a different matter altogether – this really is a super site!
Despite being well hidden by chest high ferns, once discovered, it is great place to explore.

There are 5 façade stones still standing – 3 x 1m in height, 1 x 1.5m and 1 x 2m – (covered in ‘hairy lichen’ with a quartz section at the top). There are two cap stones in situ with the chamber open to the sky either side. The chamber is full of tall ferns and I was unable to crawl through the narrow passage which is about 1m high. Under the central capstone is a pair of stones which restrict the width of the passage. A further two ‘narrowing stones’ are located at the end of the passage but has no covering capstone.

I write these notes sat in the end of the chamber, surrounded by ferns and out of the hot glare of the sun. Looking down the passage I can see Dafydd battling away against the ferns!

This is a fantastic site to visit and now with the parking area, information board and path is very easy to access. Despite not being not too far away from the A836 the chambered tomb has a feeling of remoteness about it.
Visit if you can – you won’t be disappointed.
Posted by CARL
19th August 2014ce

Borrowston (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited 24.7.14

Directions:
On the eastern side of the A99.
A short distance south of Thrumster.

The remains of the broch are easily seen from the road and is only a short walk from the road - through a field of sheep. It is now no more than a large grass covered mound approximately 2m high.

CANMORE state:
The remains of this broch have been reduced to a large grass-grown mound situated at the edge of a cultivated field 240m S of Borrowston farmsteading (ND 3291 4381). The main body of the mound measures 35m in diameter by 2.5m in height, but what is probably the position of the broch is marked by a mound measuring 13.5m from NE to SW by 12m transversely and up to 1.2m in height, which rises from its flat top a little W of its centre. A small, probably modern, pit measuring 1m in diameter and 0.5m in depth, has been dug into the upper mound. What may be the remains of a building are situated immediately to the E of the upper mound, where there is a shallow depression about 8m in length. In a corresponding position immediately to the W of the broch the surface of the mound has been heavily disturbed.
(YARROWS04 688)
Visited by RCAHMS (JRS) 12 August 2004
Posted by CARL
19th August 2014ce
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