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Winecove Point (Cliff Fort) — Miscellaneous

Theories differ as to whether this was originally one large cliff fort comprising a wide promontory, two separate forts now split into three, or whether there were always three separate promontories each with its own ramparts.

Either way, there are three now, separated by Wine Cove and Pepper Cove.

From Cornwall & Scilly HER:
Winecove Point is a complex site of uncertain development consisting of three promontories each with ramparts of various construction. It is assumed to have originated as one cliff castle, subsequently in part eroded away, but it may have developed as one organisation based on the three promontories. Each part of the site is described below; there has been very little work done on this site and the only finds known are a hearth exposed in a cliff face, and at least one spindle whorl has been found here. Such finds indicate that the site was occupied, but the extent of internal activity remains quite unknown. More work is needed on this site. The site is included in the Schedule.

The northernmost promontory of the cliff castle at Winecove Point possibly is a separate cliff castle in its own right. It is defended from the mainland by a single rock-cut ditch 0.3m deep with an inner bank 0.4m high. The rampart is much eroded and silted, as is the rest of the promontory, which is exposed to the worst of the weather. The rampart is continuous but rather lower in the middle, as if for an entrance. There seem to have been no finds in the area, and no evidence for occupation of the site.

The middle of the three promontories that form the Winecove Point cliff castle is better preserved than the others, and is defended by a double ditch with narrow central entrance. A further ditch is said locally to have originated as a track for a steam engine raising marble from a wreck in the cove below. A hearth is visible in the cliff section at SW 8537 7370, on the north-west side of the eroded cliff. A spindle whorl was found in a small cave at SW 8544 7371, on the sheltered south face of the cliff. The whorl is 4.0cm across, and ornamented by incised lines (now in possession of Mrs Taylor at Whitworth). The extent of occupation is not certain. The site is much denuded.

The southern of the three promontories that form the Winecove Point cliff castle is defended by three well spaced ramparts, two of which are rock cut. Only the middle one has an accompanying bank and has a central causeway. The other two have staggered entrances towards the southern ends of the ditches. It is suggested that the inner ditch is not contemporary with the other two on account of its straightness. There are a couple of depressions within what the OS call the sole rampart that may be hut circles. There is no evidence of occupation from finds etc.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd July 2015ce

Dun Chaich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 29, 2015

This robbed dun lies on a steep rocky ridge, Cnoc a'Chrochadair, on the spine of the Uiginish peninsula, about a kilometre west of Dunvegan, on Skye. The location is impressive and would have been a fine vantage point, but today there is little to see apart from stretches of foundation course.

Access to Dùn Chaich is from the same starting point as for Dun Totaig. But this time, turn left where the path branches just north of the field, and follow a pleasant, wide grassy path for about 400 metres till you meet the first gate. Now head left, uphill to the conspicuous dip in the ridge, and work your way up to the summit of the crag on the right. It's probably best to contour round the easier slopes to the north and approach from the northeast.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
1st July 2015ce

Dun Chaich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Dun Chaich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Chaich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Chaich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Chaich</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
1st July 2015ce

Carnedd y Ddelw (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman<b>Carnedd y Ddelw</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
1st July 2015ce

Dun Totaig (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 29, 2015

Excavated by Countess Latour, who was the first to excavate brochs on the Isle of Skye—Dun Fhiadhart in 1892 and Dun Beag in 1914—Dun Totaig is now largely a mass of tumbled stones, particularly in the interior. Nonetheless, some structure does remain: a good section of foundation course in the south and a neatly built section of entrance passage in the north.

The Dun lies less than a kilometre from Uiginish House, from where a good farm track leads southwest from beside a large barn.

One problem I faced came where the initially straight path bore left as it started to circle round the foot of Beinn a'Ghuail, a low (57 metrte) gorse-clad hill. The path became increasingly muddy, and after 100 metres or so the mud was over the top of my boots.

So I climbed the fence into the field on the left, which provided good walking to the Dun. There is in fact a gate into this field at the point where the path forks (the left branch heading southeast towards Dun Chaich). Provided there is no livestock grazing, this would have been the best mode of approach.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
1st July 2015ce

Dun Totaig (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Totaig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Totaig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Totaig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Totaig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Totaig</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
1st July 2015ce

Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut' (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut'</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut'</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut'</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut'</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Bosporthennis 'Beehive Hut'</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
30th June 2015ce

Boskednan Southern Cairn (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Boskednan Southern Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
30th June 2015ce

Carnedd Pen y Borth Goch (Cairn(s)) — Images

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30th June 2015ce

Bryn Celli Ddu (Chambered Cairn) — News

News from Rupert Soskin: stone pillar is blueschist


I don't know whether Rupert Soskin posts here any more (if he does come on to discuss this I will delete this entry). I've just read this on the Facebook "Standing with Stones" page and, having not long since visited Bryn Celli Ddu, found it Very Interesting indeed.

Below is Rupert's FB post:

"Hi folks, Rupert here.
I thought it important to share this as many of you have expressed an interest. I was contacted last night on Twitter by Ffion Reynolds who had been to Bryn Celli Ddu with a geologist who identified the 'tree' pillar as blueschist - i.e rock, not fossil.
Now, the interesting thing about blueschist is that it is a metamorphic rock which only forms in extremely particular circumstances, best explained by this quote from the United States Geological Survey's website:
...................................
For many years geologists have been able to relate individual facies to the pressure and temperature conditions of metamorphism.
But they had no satisfactory explanation for the geologic processes that form metamorphic rocks, that is, until the theory of plate tectonics emerged.
One good example is this relatively rare metamorphic rock called "blue schist."
Experimental work had shown that the minerals in blue schist form only under very unusual metamorphic conditions.
These conditions are a pressure range equivalent to a depth of 15 to 30 kilometers in the crust and a very cool temperature, only 200 to 400 degrees centigrade.
That's the approximate cooking temperature of a kitchen oven or toaster.
At a depth of 15 to 30 kilometers, however, the temperature is normally about twice as hot, 500 to 750 degrees centigrade.
So the only way that rocks can be metamorphosed to blue schist facies , is to be quickly shoved down to those extreme depths and then rapidly brought back up before the rocks have time to heat up completely.
And that's exactly what happens where two tectonic plates are colliding in a subduction zone.
In fact, blue schist bearing rocks normally occur in long linear zones that mark ancient plate subduction boundaries.
..................................
One of the principal reasons I clung to the fossil theory was the cylindrical tree-trunk shape which had clearly not been cut, despite all previous descriptions of it being 'carefully worked'.
The formation of blueschist could allow a seam of cooling rock to literally roll up between the tectonic plates rather like a piece of seaside rock.
This leaves us with two, rather lovely points:
One: The builders of Bryn Celli Ddu would know no difference, it was still a magical stone tree.
And Two: Metamorphic rock does not form in conveniently sized pieces. There must be more."
tjj Posted by tjj
30th June 2015ce

Dozmary Pool (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Dozmary Pool</b>Posted by Crazylegs14 Crazylegs14 Posted by Crazylegs14
30th June 2015ce

Men Scryfa (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Men Scryfa</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Men Scryfa</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Men Scryfa</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th June 2015ce

Nedinagh West (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Nedinagh West</b>Posted by Meic<b>Nedinagh West</b>Posted by Meic<b>Nedinagh West</b>Posted by Meic Meic Posted by Meic
29th June 2015ce

Barryshall (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Barryshall</b>Posted by Meic<b>Barryshall</b>Posted by Meic Meic Posted by Meic
29th June 2015ce

Boslow Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Boslow Stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
29th June 2015ce

Kinbrace Hill (Chambered Cairn) — Images

<b>Kinbrace Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
29th June 2015ce
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