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D35 Valthe (Hunebed) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>D35 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D35 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D35 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D35 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D35 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
23rd April 2014ce

D35 Valthe (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

This medium sized hunebed measures 8.5 by 3.2 metres, and lies at the northernmost tip of the Valtherbos woodland between Klijndijk and Valthe—no more than two kilometres from either village. I visited Hunebed D35 Valthe directly from the Valthe Twins of D36 and D37, walking through the fields along Langhietsweg, then picking up Brinkweg then Westerweg from the west of Valthe. Where Westerweg passes a large expanse of woodland, you will encounter a 'Hunebed Sign' directing you along a footpath to the right, immediately in front of the trees. Hunebed D35 Valthe lies half-way along this forest edge, in an obvious clearling.

On first approach, only the tops of some of the stones are visible, as the remains of the original barrow are still sufficient to conceal much of the monument. Originally, this hunebed possessed 10 sidestones and a probable 5 capstones. Only two capstones (one still in place) have survived to the present day, and all the sidestones are deeply buried in the sand, some almost completely hidden.

Notwithstanding its somewhat ruinous state, D35 is most certainly worth a visit. The location is atmospheric, specially in autumn when the nearby heather is in full bloom.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
23rd April 2014ce

Arminghall Henge — Images

<b>Arminghall Henge</b>Posted by ruskus Posted by ruskus
23rd April 2014ce

Blackrock (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

I've tried to get to this tomb on two previous occasions, defeated both times by the forestry, the lack of detail on the map and the many gated bungaloids. not today however, the archaeology.ie screenshot landing me right on top of it.

There is a field that comes all the way down from the cairn on top of Lugnagun into the townland of Blackrock. Up through this for about 300 metres along the old path way here and over to the north-east for another 300 metres and there she sits in the corner of the adjacent field.

When Ó Nualláin visited the site in 1989 or 1993, he saw much more of the structure than I could se today. The roofless gallery sits in much of its cairn, but any facade or larger stones are now covered by vegetation and soil, even at this early time of the year. There is evidence of the classic wedge tomb double-walling on the south side of the tomb. The gallery faces just south of west. The cairn is almost a metre and a half high.

From the back of the tomb, the view is dominated by the ridge of Kippure, Seefingan, Corrig and Seahan. Views to the west are of Blessington reservoir.

A kind of a disappointment as I was expecting to see a lot more of the structure, but a good thing that so much more than the usual skeleton remains.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
23rd April 2014ce

Oldcourt (Ring Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Oldcourt ring cairn, robbed out cairn or barrow is relatively easy to get to. It's in an area that has much of interest, south-west of a large habitation site at the top of Woodend Hill. There are great views to the south and the tree-line that contains Lugnagun passage grave is visible, though a daunting prospect across the valley and up a steep incline.

The cairn/barrow is about 15 metres across and the stony bank is visible at a height of .3 of a metre, though very hard to get a good shot of with all the rushes and stuff. I had her nibs in tow and even though I wanted to, I didn't fancy the climb to the top of Woodend Hill with her one my shoulders.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
23rd April 2014ce

Goldenhill (Rath) — Images

<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Goldenhill</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Paviland Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Fieldnotes

Visited 18.4.14

Being such an iconic site, Paviland Cave is a place I have been desperate to visit for a number of years. My ‘close but no cigar’ visit of last year had only made me even more determined to finally gain access to the cave.

The opportunity for a re-visit was both unexpected and very welcome.

It was a beautiful spring day but I had been earmarked for painting duties! Sophie was out for the day and before long Karen could see I had itchy-feet and was less than happy at the thought of being stuck inside on such a lovely day. Karen then asked if there was anywhere I fancied going for the afternoon? I checked the tide times and found that low tide on the Gower was approximately 3pm. Now was my chance.

Karen knew about my previous failed visit and also knew how much I wanted to visit the cave. By 12.30 we had all piled into the car (Owen came with us in Sophie’s absence) and we were soon on our way – I was so excited!

I was a bit concerned about the traffic we would hit on a sunny bank holiday and sure enough the first bottle-neck was at (the less than delightful) Port Talbot. Once through that we again ground to a halt in Swansea. Clearly we weren’t the only people intending to visit the Swansea area today. The shop car parks we passed were full to over flowing – haven’t people got better things to do on a beautiful bank holiday than go shopping? It seems not.

I kept checking my watch and remembered how I had misjudged the tide last time. But what can you do when stuck in a traffic jam? After what seemed like an age we got through Swansea and onto the quieter roads of the Gower itself. To be fair to Karen she drove a quickly as she could (within speed limits of course) and we eventually arrived at Pilton Green.

Myself and Owen jumped out of the car (Dafydd wanted to come with us but I didn’t think it would be safe for him - given the sharp rocks I knew we had to cross) so Karen and Dafydd drove on to the car park / café / shop in Rhossili.

We jogged through the fields and down towards the rocky gorge. With great relief I saw that the tide was still out – hurrah!

We slowly and carefully made our way across the sharp rocks down onto the flatter part of the beach. I looked back to realise that the last time I visited and sat on the rocks (and was tempted to try to wade out to the cave) the depth of water would have been way over my head – so I am glad I didn’t try it!
We walked around to the right and there it was, up in the cliff face – Paviland Cave!

From the beach the cave didn’t look as big as I was expecting and we wasted no time in clambering up the rocks to get to the cave entrance. Outside the cave the sun shone in a dark blue cloudless sky and it felt like summer. Inside the cave it was much cooler which was welcomed after our jog and clamber.

I went straight to the back of the cave to take in the famous view of the teardrop shaped cave entrance looking out onto the (for today anyway) clam blue sea. I looked all around the cave and was appalled to see that someone had scoured the words ‘Myke and Christie’ onto the cave wall – I hope they are very proud of themselves? :(

I then tried to climb up to the high 'upper chamber' on the right. I was in two minds about attempting this as the cave wall is vertical and I didn’t want to fall and injure myself in here! However, there were very tempting natural hand-holes so I went for it! I managed to get up to the edge of the cave but I couldn’t find a final place to hold to get up into it. I did however get high enough to see that the cave sloped upwards to the left and that there was light coming in from the end of the cave – another entrance perhaps?

I then spotted the sanded over section towards the front of the main cave, presumably where the skeleton was found? The sand covered a Hessian sheet which I assume is to protect an archaeological dig?

We sat and pondered and I was explaining to Owen the importance of this cave and why I wanted to visit it so much. I also explained how the view out of the cave would have been very different to what we saw today! He found this fascinating – as did I.

At this point another family arrived, two adults and a boy of about 11. We said ‘hello’ and I had a quick chat to the lady. It was clear that she was the main reason they were visiting today! Myself and Owen went outside to explore the many rock pools and sea anemones and to leave the family have their turn alone in the cave.

The tide began to turn and we all made our way back up the rocks to the safety of the gorge. It wasn’t long before flat part of the beach became submerged and the cave once again cut off. I felt both elated and relived to have completed my ‘pilgrimage’.

We walked back up to the road (about 1 mile) and I ‘phoned Karen to pick us up.
One problem – there was no signal in Rhossili.
Only one thing for it – a 4 mile walk along narrow country lanes, in the blazing sun, to Rhossili. To say that Owen was unimpressed would be putting it mildly!

It goes without saying that this is a ‘must see’ site for all those able to do so.


A few tips when planning your visit to Paviland:

1. Despite my initial reservations it appears to be ok to park alongside the farm track opposite the public footpath sign in Pilton Green. There were several cars parked there and as long as it isn’t too muddy you should be ok.

2. The walk from the road to the cave is easy, through a couple of fields / kissing gates. However, once you get to the gorge the rocks are very sharp and quite difficult to cross safely. It is only suitable for those who are mobile and fairly agile. The rocks from the beach to the cave present the same problems.

3. There is no ‘phone signal in the area around the cave and I would advise you take someone with you. I would dread to think of the consequences if you had a fall and injured yourself / knocked yourself out when the tide turned.

4. It is obviously vital you check the tide times and make sure you don’t get cut off.
Posted by CARL
22nd April 2014ce

D37 Valthe (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D37 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D37 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D37 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

Goldenhill mound (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Goldenhill mound</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

D37 Valthe (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D37 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

Goldenhill mound (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Goldenhill mound</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

D37 Valthe (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: April 14, 2014

Hunebed D37 Valthe lies half a kilometre due south of the village of Valthe, just a handful of metres east of its twin, D36.

There is not a lot to say about this hunebed, which is very incomplete: of its original six capstones, two lie inside the passage grave, while the other four are missing altogether. For most of its length, the grave passage lies exposed and empty.

Despite this, the site is highly atmospheric and well worth the visit, surrounded by exquisite oak trees and expansive green fields. And of course, hunebed D36 lies only a few metres to the west, on the same site.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

Blackrock (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Blackrock</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Blackrock</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Blackrock</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Oldcourt (Ring Cairn) — Images

<b>Oldcourt</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Oldcourt</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Oldcourt</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Valthe (Complex) — Images

<b>Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

D36 Valthe (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D36 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D36 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D36 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D36 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D36 Valthe</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

D36 Valthe (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: April 14, 2014

Hunebed D36 Valthe lies just half a kilometre due south of the Village of Valthe in the Dutch province of Drenthe. The No 58 bus from either Groningen or Assen passes through the centre of Valthe, where you should alight at the Linderakkers bus halt. Just a few metres from the bus shelter, a green Hunebed Sign directs you to Holtesweg, which leads through fields, crossing Langhietsweg on the way. By this point, you will already see a small group of trees standing clear of the general woodlands, to the right of the path ahead, and within it, Hunebed D36 Valthe.

This hunebed is very nearly 10 metres long and 4 metres wide, consisting of 10 sidestones, originally 5 capstones and one entrance stone, but there is no evidence that there was ever a ring of kerbstones around this monument. Today, only one capstone remains in place, three of the others having become dislodged from their supports over the course of time while one is missing: they nevertheless continue to present an impressive aspect, particularly the huge westernmost capstone. Another feature of this hunebed, which is not known ever to have been excavated and where only minimal restoration has ever taken place (in 1952), is the extensive coating of lichens, which gives the stones a yellowish-green appearance.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd April 2014ce

Goldenhill (Rath) — Miscellaneous

Liam Price visited here on 29 September 1929

"There is a rath about 20 or 25yds in diameter just N of the top point of Goldenhill. Almost due E, just outside the entrance are six large boulders, suggesting a passageway by their appearances. There seems to be the remains os a chamber or cist in the centre of the rath – and the surface inside is not even, but consists os a large wide pit 5 or 6ft deep in the centre (containing the stones of the chamber) with six smaller pits of the same depth irregularly placed around – the surface now all grass- and bracken-grown."

He returned on 11 October 1944 (and had second thoughts)

"Raheen at Goldenhill, Kilbride. I examined this again and noted more details. It has an outer fosse and an inner bank: I saw no trace of an outer bank. Depth of fosse below level of field, only about 1ft, width of fosse 9 paces or yards, height of inner bank over fosse about 7ft: fairly even all round.

Six blocks at entrance, the outer two are near the outside edge of the fosse – 9ft apart, one 3ft high by 3ft across (S side), the other 6ft high by 5ft across (N side). The other four are on the outer slope of the gap or entrance through the bank, 9 to 10ft apart, and each about 3ft high – the lower one on the S side has been cut through with wedges, and the broken-off piece is lying there.



Diameter of enclosed space of raheen, about 25 paces. It is very uneven, so that it is impossible to pace it across. Going in through the entrance, on the left is a round pit 5 or 6ft deep and 10ft or so across – and there are two somewhat smaller pits close inside the bank further to the SE and S. Between the first and second, and going in a crooked line across to the W or NW side is a long depression: and across this from the entrance, on the west side is another hollow, and it is in this one that the stones are which I though in 1929 were the stones of a chamber. This pit is not in the centre, but W of the centre. The stone which looked to me like a capstone is about 3ft wide, mostly buried in the grass – and there are other stones under and near it. I now think that these might be stones forming part of a ruined hut (door?). The other pits might also be the ruins of huts. [In 1929] I spoke of six smaller pits, but three I have mentioned here are the best preserved, as round pits.

The inside of the raheen would I think be higher than the level of the field outside, even allowing for a buried accumulation of stones. All the stones and block are of granite.

The Liam Price Notebooks – The placenames, antiquities and topography of County Wicklow
Edited by Christiaan Corlett and Mairéad Weaver
2002 Dúchas, The Heritage Service
ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Arch. Inventory of Co. Wicklow says:

Description: Situated on a very gentle SW-facing slope c. 200m SW of the summit of Golden Hill. Circular area (diam. 37m) defined by a stony bank (Wth c. 4m; int. H 0.7m) and an external fosse (av. Wth 6m; av. D 0.7m). There is a gap in the bank (Wth 5m) and causeway across the fosse (Wth 6m) at the NE with another causeway (Wth c. 12m) at the SE. There are some large stones in situ in the interior of the site and traces of a boulder revetment at the base of the bank. Possibly a modified prehistoric kerbed cairn. (Price 1934, 46)
ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Herity has this in his inventory of Irish passage graves, listed as Wi 1.

"At a height of 274m (900') stands a ruined circular structure 36m in diameter and 4.5m high. There appear to be upright kerbstones around the edge and a pair of matched stones in the north-east quadrant. two other tumuli stand close by, one in Goldenhill Td. (Sheet 5) and the other in Kilbride Td. (Sheet1)"
[Mr. P. Healy]

From Irish Passage Graves: Neolithic Tomb-Builders in Ireland and Britain 2500 B.C.
by Michael Herity
1974 Irish University Press
ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd April 2014ce

Wayland's Smithy (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>Wayland's Smithy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wayland's Smithy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wayland's Smithy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wayland's Smithy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
21st April 2014ce

Exloo Zuideres (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited: April 15, 2014

Following a visit to Hunebed D30 Exloo, consider walking just over half a kilometre farther along the neatly cobbled access road. Soon you will see, in the field on your left, a stand of mature trees circling a large burial mound, over 5 metres tall. Without a distinctive name, this is labelled after the region where it stands, as Grafheuvel Exloo Zuideres ('Grafheuvel', in Dutch, means 'Burial Hill').

The information pillar beside the grave states:

"Between about 2850 BCE and the start of the current era, the prehistoric inhabitants of these parts were in the habit of covering their graves with a mound of sand or turf. Later, more people were often buried in an existing mound, which then had to be made somewhat larger.

"This particular mound was investigated in 1847. It was found that a circle of boulders had been incorporated into the hill.

"On the basis of this excavation, the burial mound was dated in the Bronze Age, between about 2000 and 1500 BCE."
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st April 2014ce

Exloo Zuideres (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Exloo Zuideres</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Exloo Zuideres</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Exloo Zuideres</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Exloo Zuideres</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st April 2014ce
Showing 1-50 of 103,046 posts. Most recent first | Next 50